Cover image for Passport to the cosmos : human transformation and alien encourters
Title:
Passport to the cosmos : human transformation and alien encourters
Author:
Mack, John E., 1929-2004.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Crown Publishers, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xii, 306 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780517705681
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Orchard Park Library BF2050 .M335 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library BF2050 .M335 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

In his groundbreaking follow-up to the best-selling Abduction, Pulitzer Prize-winner John E. Mack, M.D., powerfully demonstrates how the alien abduction phenomenon calls for a revolutionary new way of examining the nature of reality and our place in the cosmos. Harvard professor John E. Mack stunned the world when he first published in Abduction the astonishing results of his extensive research involving clients who reported they had had encounters with alien life-forms. In Passport to the Cosmos, Mack, who has done additional research with abductees in the United States and around the world, provocatively asserts that this phenomenon is part of a new era in human consciousness, a time in which we must be willing to embrace the idea that alien visitation is real on some level. For Mack, the alien abduction phenomenon is nothing short of a cosmic wake-up call to humans that we do indeed live in a world filled with spirits and beings who can cross the barrier we have thrown up between the material and immaterial worlds. Drawing on the rich tradition of non-Western and indigenous cultures, which more readily accept that we live in a multidimensional universe, Mack persuasively shows that by broadening our definition of "what is real," we can begin to explore a phenomenon that has deep and lasting implications for humanity. By sharing the vivid and dramatic encounters of experiencers, Mack illuminates a phenomenon that has shattered the worldviews of the people who have experienced it. Time and time again, experiencers from all cultures say their lives have been radically altered by their encounters with aliens in ways that are both traumatic and transformative. This transformation seems to be an intrinsic part of the alien abduction phenomenon, which is marked by a variety of elements that go beyond the physical manifestation of alien visitation. In Passport to the Cosmos, John Mack further solidifies his reputation as a brave pioneer on the forefront of the science of human experience, an authoritative voice that will take us into the twenty-first century.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

This is a follow-up to the author's very popular Abduction (1994). Mack believes that the cosmos is populated by a hierarchy of multidimensional beings, some of whom are seeking to communicate warnings and spiritual instructions with beings in our realm. It appears that we are on a path to ultimate destruction, but the "Greys" have been engaged to help us. Experiences where humans believe that they have been impregnated or sexually involved with aliens are either metaphors for alien attempts to communicate ideas to us or attempts to create a hybrid, spiritually superior race. Mack sees the absence of physical presence as direct proof that aliens are really functioning on a higher order of reality. Although this book will be very popular with patrons who are convinced that the phenomenon represents communication from another realm, others who desire more critical thinking will find it deeply flawed and insubstantial. --Eric Robbins


Publisher's Weekly Review

Here is a fascinating foray into an exotic world. From Harvard psychiatry professor and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Mack comes a second book (after Abduction) based on accounts by people who claim to have been abducted by aliens. While he fudges the question of whether the aliens are "real in a strictly material sense," he insist that the experience is "real" for the abductees, in the way that shamans' spiritual journeys are real to them; indeed, a couple of his interviewees are shamans. He focuses on the newly emerging spiritual importance of the alleged abductees' message. Their reports, Mack believes, reveal much about human culture and the future of the human race. In extensive interviews with Mack, those who claim to have been abducted, report that the aliens are especially motivated by questions of ecological destruction, and that they may even be survivors of a destroyed civilization seeking to breed hybrid children with humans to ensure the survival of both the human race and their own. Overwhelmingly, the abductees state that the aliens visit Earth to warn us that our cavalier tree-cutting, water-polluting, trash-dumping habits will have dire consequences if we do not change our ways. Abductees are left with not only a profound caring for the environment, but with a sense that they have encountered creatures sent by whatever power rules the universe. They particularly find that their experiences resonate with Native American religions. This discussion leads into what is possibly the most intriguing section of the book, the examination of sex between humans and aliensÄgreat sex, by numerous accounts. But as a serious investigation into a mystifying experience, Mack's account poses questions begging for answers. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Mack, a Harvard University psychiatrist and Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer of T.E. Lawrence, created an academic stir with the publication of Abduction: Human Encounters with Aliens (1994), in which he argued that tales of alien abduction were true. As a result, Harvard warned him to adhere to its standards of conduct for clinical research. In this follow-up, Mack, still undaunted, argues that our knowledge of reality needs to change and that scientific rationalism alone cannot explain the alien abduction syndrome. He examines traditional views of reality, the implications for humanity in light of the abduction phenomenon, and the traumatic effects on "experiencers" or abductees. Mack's work with indigenous peopleÄshamans and medicine men and womenÄsuggests that the phenomenon is not simply a product of Western imagination. This veritable handbook of New Age philosophy will find a readership in most public libraries. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 2/1/99.]ÄGary D. Barber, formerly with SUNY Coll. at Fredonia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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