Cover image for Encyclopedia of genetics
Title:
Encyclopedia of genetics
Author:
Knight, Jeffrey A., 1948-
Publication Information:
Pasadena, Calif. : Salem Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
2 volumes (xx, 598 pages, xx pages) : illustrations ; 27 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. Aggression - heredity and environment -- v.2. Hermaphrodites - XYY syndrome, index.
ISBN:
9780893569785

9780893569792

9780893569808
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QH427 .E53 1999 V.2 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library QH427 .E53 1999 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

This encyclopedia of genetics contains 172 entries which survey this exciting and continually evolving disclipine from a variety of perspectives, offering historical and technical background along with discussion of discoveries and accomplishments.


Summary

"Breakthrough discoveries in the field of genetics have increased the general public's interest in the area. The Encyclopedia of Genetics was created to meet the demands of such users. The 172 articles range from 1,000 to 3,500 words and include key features such as a list of the defined words and a significance section that summarizes the article. The contributors give clear explanations of complex theories and methods aimed at the general reader. This is a unique resource to answer genetic questions from the non-scientific community."--"Outstanding reference sources 2000", American Libraries, May 2000. Comp. by the Reference Sources Committee, RUSA, ALA.


Summary

"Breakthrough discoveries in the field of genetics have increased the general public's interest in the area. The Encyclopedia of Genetics was created to meet the demands of such users. The 172 articles range from 1,000 to 3,500 words and include key features such as a list of the defined words and a significance section that summarizes the article. The contributors give clear explanations of complex theories and methods aimed at the general reader. This is a unique resource to answer genetic questions from the non-scientific community."--"Outstanding reference sources 2000", American Libraries, May 2000. Comp. by the Reference Sources Committee, RUSA, ALA.


Reviews 9

Booklist Review

This clear, well-written guide to an area of emerging importance in science and policy will be useful to undergraduates and the general public. Topics include bacterial genetics, classical transmission genetics, developmental genetics, genetics engineering and biotechnology, human genetics, immunogenetics, molecular genetics, and population studies. The articles strive to be objective, even in the face of controversy. The articles on sociobiology and the human cloning debate are examples. There are 172 signed, alphabetically arranged entries, ranging in length from 1,000 to 3,500 words. Contributors, listed at the beginning of volume 1, have university affiliations or are identified as independent scholars. Articles begin with a quick summary of the entry, including field of study, significance of the topic, and key terms. See also references and suggestions for further reading are listed after the body of the entries. The topics and bibliographies are very current to the time of publication. Following the A^-Z entries are a "Time Line of Major Developments in Genetics," brief biographical entries of important geneticists, a glossary, a general bibliography, a category list of entries, and an index. More than 200 black-and-white photographs and illustrations accompany the text, along with charts, diagrams, and tables. The audience for the Encyclopedia of Genetics is less the biological researcher and more the public with a general understanding of science and the issues it raises. It is less specialized than The Encyclopedia of Bioethics, edited by Warren T. Reich [RBB O 15 96]. The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, edited by John Kendrew and Eleanor Lawrence (Blackwell Science, 1994), and Molecular Biology & Biotechnology: A Comprehensive Desk Reference, edited by Robert A. Meyers (VCH, 1995), are excellent sources of genetic information. Another source is KEGG: Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genetics and Genomes (Kyoto, Japan, GenomeNet, 1998^-), which is a full-text molecular and cellular biology project from the Japanese Human Genome Program [http://www.genome.ad.jp/kegg/]. These are written more with the practicing scientist in mind. The Encyclopedia of Genetics is recommended for both smaller and larger academic and public libraries.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-The purpose of this encyclopedia is twofold. First, it provides a basis for understanding the fundamental principles of the science, and second, it highlights current advances and applications of genetic research in the fields of human medical genetics and agriculture. The 172 entries written by academics and researchers range from lengthy essays to short articles. Each is introduced with a notation stating the field of study (e.g., molecular genetics), a brief statement on the important points covered in the article, and key terms with definitions. Some of the major areas examined are bacterial genetics, population genetics, genetic engineering and biotechnology, classical transmission, and immunogenetics. See-also references and an annotated bibliography are provided for each article. Appendixes include an extensive time line of major developments in the field, a 17-page glossary, and a biographical dictionary. Occasional black-and-white photographs and line drawings accompany the text. This well-written set will be most useful for students with some background in biology, but general readers will appreciate the discussions on the broader social issues raised by modern genetics research.-P. A. Dolan, Illinois State University, Normal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Recent developments in cloning and gene therapy have brought genetics to the forefront of public consciousness. This encyclopedia covers these new discoveries and also explains the basics of genetics for general readers. The 172 signed articles, arranged alphabetically, each include a paragraph on the significance of the topic, definitions of key terms, cross-references, and suggestions for further reading. About 200 black-and-white photographs and other illustrations, four appendixes (a time line, biographical dictionary, glossary, and bibliography), and a list of articles by category are included. Most of the 89 contributors are associated with US academic institutions. The articles are well written and understandable to nonspecialists; many provide historical background and discussions of social issues. Unfortunately, they are inappropriately packaged. Many illustrations are larger than necessary, and some photographs are of dubious value (e.g., a full-page photograph of a mouse being injected). The work's useful content would fit easily into a single volume. Those seeking a less expensive alternative may prefer George P. Redei's Genetics Manual: Current Theory, Concepts, Terms (1998). J. M. Wehmeyer Wright State University


Booklist Review

This clear, well-written guide to an area of emerging importance in science and policy will be useful to undergraduates and the general public. Topics include bacterial genetics, classical transmission genetics, developmental genetics, genetics engineering and biotechnology, human genetics, immunogenetics, molecular genetics, and population studies. The articles strive to be objective, even in the face of controversy. The articles on sociobiology and the human cloning debate are examples. There are 172 signed, alphabetically arranged entries, ranging in length from 1,000 to 3,500 words. Contributors, listed at the beginning of volume 1, have university affiliations or are identified as independent scholars. Articles begin with a quick summary of the entry, including field of study, significance of the topic, and key terms. See also references and suggestions for further reading are listed after the body of the entries. The topics and bibliographies are very current to the time of publication. Following the A^-Z entries are a "Time Line of Major Developments in Genetics," brief biographical entries of important geneticists, a glossary, a general bibliography, a category list of entries, and an index. More than 200 black-and-white photographs and illustrations accompany the text, along with charts, diagrams, and tables. The audience for the Encyclopedia of Genetics is less the biological researcher and more the public with a general understanding of science and the issues it raises. It is less specialized than The Encyclopedia of Bioethics, edited by Warren T. Reich [RBB O 15 96]. The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, edited by John Kendrew and Eleanor Lawrence (Blackwell Science, 1994), and Molecular Biology & Biotechnology: A Comprehensive Desk Reference, edited by Robert A. Meyers (VCH, 1995), are excellent sources of genetic information. Another source is KEGG: Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genetics and Genomes (Kyoto, Japan, GenomeNet, 1998^-), which is a full-text molecular and cellular biology project from the Japanese Human Genome Program [http://www.genome.ad.jp/kegg/]. These are written more with the practicing scientist in mind. The Encyclopedia of Genetics is recommended for both smaller and larger academic and public libraries.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-The purpose of this encyclopedia is twofold. First, it provides a basis for understanding the fundamental principles of the science, and second, it highlights current advances and applications of genetic research in the fields of human medical genetics and agriculture. The 172 entries written by academics and researchers range from lengthy essays to short articles. Each is introduced with a notation stating the field of study (e.g., molecular genetics), a brief statement on the important points covered in the article, and key terms with definitions. Some of the major areas examined are bacterial genetics, population genetics, genetic engineering and biotechnology, classical transmission, and immunogenetics. See-also references and an annotated bibliography are provided for each article. Appendixes include an extensive time line of major developments in the field, a 17-page glossary, and a biographical dictionary. Occasional black-and-white photographs and line drawings accompany the text. This well-written set will be most useful for students with some background in biology, but general readers will appreciate the discussions on the broader social issues raised by modern genetics research.-P. A. Dolan, Illinois State University, Normal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Recent developments in cloning and gene therapy have brought genetics to the forefront of public consciousness. This encyclopedia covers these new discoveries and also explains the basics of genetics for general readers. The 172 signed articles, arranged alphabetically, each include a paragraph on the significance of the topic, definitions of key terms, cross-references, and suggestions for further reading. About 200 black-and-white photographs and other illustrations, four appendixes (a time line, biographical dictionary, glossary, and bibliography), and a list of articles by category are included. Most of the 89 contributors are associated with US academic institutions. The articles are well written and understandable to nonspecialists; many provide historical background and discussions of social issues. Unfortunately, they are inappropriately packaged. Many illustrations are larger than necessary, and some photographs are of dubious value (e.g., a full-page photograph of a mouse being injected). The work's useful content would fit easily into a single volume. Those seeking a less expensive alternative may prefer George P. Redei's Genetics Manual: Current Theory, Concepts, Terms (1998). J. M. Wehmeyer Wright State University


Booklist Review

This clear, well-written guide to an area of emerging importance in science and policy will be useful to undergraduates and the general public. Topics include bacterial genetics, classical transmission genetics, developmental genetics, genetics engineering and biotechnology, human genetics, immunogenetics, molecular genetics, and population studies. The articles strive to be objective, even in the face of controversy. The articles on sociobiology and the human cloning debate are examples. There are 172 signed, alphabetically arranged entries, ranging in length from 1,000 to 3,500 words. Contributors, listed at the beginning of volume 1, have university affiliations or are identified as independent scholars. Articles begin with a quick summary of the entry, including field of study, significance of the topic, and key terms. See also references and suggestions for further reading are listed after the body of the entries. The topics and bibliographies are very current to the time of publication. Following the A^-Z entries are a "Time Line of Major Developments in Genetics," brief biographical entries of important geneticists, a glossary, a general bibliography, a category list of entries, and an index. More than 200 black-and-white photographs and illustrations accompany the text, along with charts, diagrams, and tables. The audience for the Encyclopedia of Genetics is less the biological researcher and more the public with a general understanding of science and the issues it raises. It is less specialized than The Encyclopedia of Bioethics, edited by Warren T. Reich [RBB O 15 96]. The Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, edited by John Kendrew and Eleanor Lawrence (Blackwell Science, 1994), and Molecular Biology & Biotechnology: A Comprehensive Desk Reference, edited by Robert A. Meyers (VCH, 1995), are excellent sources of genetic information. Another source is KEGG: Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genetics and Genomes (Kyoto, Japan, GenomeNet, 1998^-), which is a full-text molecular and cellular biology project from the Japanese Human Genome Program [http://www.genome.ad.jp/kegg/]. These are written more with the practicing scientist in mind. The Encyclopedia of Genetics is recommended for both smaller and larger academic and public libraries.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-The purpose of this encyclopedia is twofold. First, it provides a basis for understanding the fundamental principles of the science, and second, it highlights current advances and applications of genetic research in the fields of human medical genetics and agriculture. The 172 entries written by academics and researchers range from lengthy essays to short articles. Each is introduced with a notation stating the field of study (e.g., molecular genetics), a brief statement on the important points covered in the article, and key terms with definitions. Some of the major areas examined are bacterial genetics, population genetics, genetic engineering and biotechnology, classical transmission, and immunogenetics. See-also references and an annotated bibliography are provided for each article. Appendixes include an extensive time line of major developments in the field, a 17-page glossary, and a biographical dictionary. Occasional black-and-white photographs and line drawings accompany the text. This well-written set will be most useful for students with some background in biology, but general readers will appreciate the discussions on the broader social issues raised by modern genetics research.-P. A. Dolan, Illinois State University, Normal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Recent developments in cloning and gene therapy have brought genetics to the forefront of public consciousness. This encyclopedia covers these new discoveries and also explains the basics of genetics for general readers. The 172 signed articles, arranged alphabetically, each include a paragraph on the significance of the topic, definitions of key terms, cross-references, and suggestions for further reading. About 200 black-and-white photographs and other illustrations, four appendixes (a time line, biographical dictionary, glossary, and bibliography), and a list of articles by category are included. Most of the 89 contributors are associated with US academic institutions. The articles are well written and understandable to nonspecialists; many provide historical background and discussions of social issues. Unfortunately, they are inappropriately packaged. Many illustrations are larger than necessary, and some photographs are of dubious value (e.g., a full-page photograph of a mouse being injected). The work's useful content would fit easily into a single volume. Those seeking a less expensive alternative may prefer George P. Redei's Genetics Manual: Current Theory, Concepts, Terms (1998). J. M. Wehmeyer Wright State University


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