Cover image for British imperial literature, 1870-1940 : writing and the administration of empire
Title:
British imperial literature, 1870-1940 : writing and the administration of empire
Author:
Bivona, Daniel.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
xi, 237 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780521591003
Format :
Book

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PR478.I53 B75 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This book is a sweeping study of the way British writers used imperial service as a stage for dramatizing new modes of social order and self-consciousness. An expanding administrative machine, Bivona argues, naturalized and domesticated bureaucratic forms of social control, inscribing the ideals of service, submission, discipline, and renunciation in the hearts and minds of the young men employed in administrating the empire. Bivona examines how this governing ideology is treated in Kipling, Conrad, T. E. Lawrence, Forster, Cary and Orwell.


Table of Contents

Introduction
1 Agents and the problem of agency: the context
2 Why Africa needs Europe: from Livingstone to Stanley
3 Kipling's 'Law' and the division of bureaucratic labor
4 Agent, instrument, and novelist: Cromer, Gordon, Conrad and the problem of imperial character
5 'Gladness of abasement': T. E. Lawrence and the erotics of imperial discipline
6 Resurrecting individualism: the interwar novels of imperial manners
Conclusion: work as rule
Bibliography