Cover image for Letters to Atticus
Title:
Letters to Atticus
Author:
Cicero, Marcus Tullius.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Ad Atticum. English
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
4 volumes : maps ; 17 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780674995710

9780674995727

9780674995734

9780674995406
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PA6308.E6 B3 1999 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library PA6308.E6 B3 1999 V.4 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library PA6308.E6 B3 1999 V.3 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Central Library PA6308.E6 B3 1999 V.2 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

In letters to his dear friend Atticus, Cicero reveals himself as to no other of his correspondents except, perhaps, his brother. These letters, in this four-volume series, also provide a vivid picture of a momentous period in Roman history--years marked by the rise of Julius Caesar and the downfall of the Republic.

When the correspondence begins in November 68 BCE the 38-year-old Cicero is a notable figure in Rome: a brilliant lawyer and orator, who has achieved primacy at the Roman bar and a political career that would culminate in the Consulship in 63. Over the next twenty-four years--to November 44, a year before he was put to death by the forces of Octavian and Mark Antony--Cicero wrote frequently to his friend and confidant, sharing news and discussing affairs of business and state. It is to this corpus of over 400 letters that we owe most of our information about Cicero's literary activity. And taken as a whole the letters provide a first-hand account of social and political life in Rome.


Author Notes

Born in Arpinum on January 3, 106 B.C., Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman orator, writer, and politician. In Rome, Cicero studied law, oratory, philosophy, and literature, before embarking on a political career. Banished from Rome in 59 B.C. for the execution of some members of the Catiline group, Cicero devoted himself to literature. Cicero was pardoned by Julius Caesar in 47 B.C., and returned to Rome to deliver his famous speeches, known as the "Philippics," urging the senate to declare war on Marc Antony.

Cicero's chief works, written between 46 and 44 B.C., can be classified in the categories of philosophical works, letters, and speeches. The letters, edited by his secretary Tiro, showcase a unique writing style and charm. The most popular work of the period was De Officiis, a manual of ethics, in which Cicero espoused fundamental Christian values half a century before Christ.

Cicero was murdered in Formiae, Italy, on December 4, 43 B.C., by Antony's soldiers after the triumvirate of Antony, Lepidus, and Octavius was formed.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Table of Contents

Introduction
Letters 1-89

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