Cover image for Miriam
Title:
Miriam
Author:
Gormley, Beatrice.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Grand Rapids, Mich. : Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
viii, 192 pages ; 21 cm
Summary:
While living in Pharaoh's palace in ancient Egypt, Miriam, the sister of Moses in the Hebrew scriptures, struggles to remain loyal to her people and her God.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 6.7 7.0 54743.
ISBN:
9780802851536

9780802851567
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Concord Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

While living in Pharoah's palace in ancient Egypt, Miriam, the sister of Moses in the Hebrew scriptures, struggles to remain loyal to her people and her God.


Summary

While living in Pharaoh's palace in ancient Egypt, Miriam struggles to remain loyal to her people and her God.


Author Notes

Beatrice Gormley is the author of many popular books for young readers, including Maria Mitchell: The Soul of an Astronomer and C. S. Lewis: Christian and Storyteller. As a writer, she admires the drama of Bible stories and is intrigued by their people. She lives in Ossining, New York


Beatrice Gormley is the author of many popular books for young readers, including Maria Mitchell: The Soul of an Astronomer and C. S. Lewis: Christian and Storyteller. As a writer, she admires the drama of Bible stories and is intrigued by their people. She lives in Ossining, New York


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-8. Miriam, the sister of Moses, comes center stage in this novel about the life of the Hebrews in the land of the pharaohs. Although the events of the familiar biblical story of Moses in the bulrushes is here, this is really a coming-of-age novel. Miriam arranges for her baby brother, Moses, to be found by the pharaoh's daughter after a decree that Hebrew male babies will be killed. She then makes sure that her mother will be Moses' wet nurse, and that she, too, will live in the palace. But as Miriam becomes more enamored of palace life, she begins to lose both her gift of second sight and her allegiance to her people. Given the opportunity to live at the palace indefinitely after her mother must leave, Miriam has to decide which life is more important. The book's structure is initially jarring; some chapters are told in the first person from Miriam's viewpoint, others in the third person from the perspective of the princess' lady-in-waiting. But once readers adapt, they will enjoy the biblical setting and appreciate Miriam as a strong heroine. Miriam's ability to see into the future gives the story an extra dimension that also will appeal. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Though brief biographies of biblical characters abound, young readers are rarely provided with fully realized portraits of key religious figures. Gormley's (Ellie's Birthstone Ring) innovative work of historical fiction offers an accessible look at the life of Miriam, Moses' older sister. The author weaves the contemporary political and geographical setting into her story and explains the tension between the Egyptians and the Hebrews during the reign of Ramses the Great. In this entertaining expansion of biblical events, Gormley describes Miriam's feisty spirit and resourceful, respectful ways. The heroine's emotions are nearly palpable when she saves her baby brother's life by sending him sailing among the rushes and into the arms of Pharaoh's daughter, Princess Bint-Anath. Gormley's novel not only imparts many interesting details but may well send children back to the original Bible passages that were its inspiration. Ages 9-14. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-Just as the animated film The Prince of Egypt brought new life to the story of Moses leading the Hebrews to the Promised Land, Gormley reinvents the story of Moses's older sister. It is 11-year-old Miriam who dreams of her infant brother's salvation in a basket on the river. And Miriam, too, who suggests to the Egyptian princess Bint-Anath that she find a wet nurse for him. Ironically, Miriam arranges for their mother to come live at the palace to care for her own son. The story is told alternately by Miriam and by a narrator observing the thoughts and actions of Nebet, the princess's lady-in-waiting, thus enabling readers to understand and appreciate both the Hebrew and Egyptian points of view. Nebet is a wise, sympathetic character, loyal to the princess, while cautious and cunning in maintaining her and her mistress' favor with Pharaoh. Miriam is far more than a biblical retelling. Gormley gives readers the universal struggle between mother and daughter. In order to please the princess and hide her Hebrew heritage, the girl adopts Egyptian costume, hairstyle, and jewelry, prompting her mother to denounce her. In the end, Miriam must choose between her people and the enticing life she has found at the palace. The author provides rich insights into the characters' motivations, as well as a vivid portrait of Hebrew and Egyptian religious and daily life.-Barbara Auerbach, Brooklyn Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 6^-8. Miriam, the sister of Moses, comes center stage in this novel about the life of the Hebrews in the land of the pharaohs. Although the events of the familiar biblical story of Moses in the bulrushes is here, this is really a coming-of-age novel. Miriam arranges for her baby brother, Moses, to be found by the pharaoh's daughter after a decree that Hebrew male babies will be killed. She then makes sure that her mother will be Moses' wet nurse, and that she, too, will live in the palace. But as Miriam becomes more enamored of palace life, she begins to lose both her gift of second sight and her allegiance to her people. Given the opportunity to live at the palace indefinitely after her mother must leave, Miriam has to decide which life is more important. The book's structure is initially jarring; some chapters are told in the first person from Miriam's viewpoint, others in the third person from the perspective of the princess' lady-in-waiting. But once readers adapt, they will enjoy the biblical setting and appreciate Miriam as a strong heroine. Miriam's ability to see into the future gives the story an extra dimension that also will appeal. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Though brief biographies of biblical characters abound, young readers are rarely provided with fully realized portraits of key religious figures. Gormley's (Ellie's Birthstone Ring) innovative work of historical fiction offers an accessible look at the life of Miriam, Moses' older sister. The author weaves the contemporary political and geographical setting into her story and explains the tension between the Egyptians and the Hebrews during the reign of Ramses the Great. In this entertaining expansion of biblical events, Gormley describes Miriam's feisty spirit and resourceful, respectful ways. The heroine's emotions are nearly palpable when she saves her baby brother's life by sending him sailing among the rushes and into the arms of Pharaoh's daughter, Princess Bint-Anath. Gormley's novel not only imparts many interesting details but may well send children back to the original Bible passages that were its inspiration. Ages 9-14. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-Just as the animated film The Prince of Egypt brought new life to the story of Moses leading the Hebrews to the Promised Land, Gormley reinvents the story of Moses's older sister. It is 11-year-old Miriam who dreams of her infant brother's salvation in a basket on the river. And Miriam, too, who suggests to the Egyptian princess Bint-Anath that she find a wet nurse for him. Ironically, Miriam arranges for their mother to come live at the palace to care for her own son. The story is told alternately by Miriam and by a narrator observing the thoughts and actions of Nebet, the princess's lady-in-waiting, thus enabling readers to understand and appreciate both the Hebrew and Egyptian points of view. Nebet is a wise, sympathetic character, loyal to the princess, while cautious and cunning in maintaining her and her mistress' favor with Pharaoh. Miriam is far more than a biblical retelling. Gormley gives readers the universal struggle between mother and daughter. In order to please the princess and hide her Hebrew heritage, the girl adopts Egyptian costume, hairstyle, and jewelry, prompting her mother to denounce her. In the end, Miriam must choose between her people and the enticing life she has found at the palace. The author provides rich insights into the characters' motivations, as well as a vivid portrait of Hebrew and Egyptian religious and daily life.-Barbara Auerbach, Brooklyn Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

The Setting for Miriam's Storyp. 1
1. The Promisep. 3
2. A Decree from the Palacep. 9
3. A Difficult Princessp. 15
4. A Bargain with Taweretp. 22
5. Pi-Ramesesp. 27
6. The Giftp. 36
7. Pharaoh's Daughterp. 44
8. An Unsuitable Childp. 51
9. Quackp. 56
10. Too Many Hebrewsp. 63
11. Bad Newsp. 69
12. Hebrews Lastp. 74
13. The Forbidden Babyp. 80
14. A Gift from a Godp. 85
15. To the Palacep. 93
16. Lost in the Palacep. 99
17. Homesickp. 108
18. Hebrews in the Palacep. 113
19. The Princess's Plansp. 120
20. Miri's Songp. 128
21. A Second Joseph?p. 133
22. Meryp. 141
23. Into the Heart of Egyptp. 151
24. An Egyptian Girlp. 160
25. A Dream and a Messagep. 167
26. Like a Daughterp. 171
27. I Am Miriamp. 180
28. Miriam's Homep. 186
The Setting for Miriam's Storyp. 1
1. The Promisep. 3
2. A Decree from the Palacep. 9
3. A Difficult Princessp. 15
4. A Bargain with Taweretp. 22
5. Pi-Ramesesp. 27
6. The Giftp. 36
7. Pharaoh's Daughterp. 44
8. An Unsuitable Childp. 51
9. Quackp. 56
10. Too Many Hebrewsp. 63
11. Bad Newsp. 69
12. Hebrews Lastp. 74
13. The Forbidden Babyp. 80
14. A Gift from a Godp. 85
15. To the Palacep. 93
16. Lost in the Palacep. 99
17. Homesickp. 108
18. Hebrews in the Palacep. 113
19. The Princess's Plansp. 120
20. Miri's Songp. 128
21. A Second Joseph?p. 133
22. Meryp. 141
23. Into the Heart of Egyptp. 151
24. An Egyptian Girlp. 160
25. A Dream and a Messagep. 167
26. Like a Daughterp. 171
27. I Am Miriamp. 180
28. Miriam's Homep. 186

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