Cover image for When we say we're home : a quartet of place and memory
Title:
When we say we're home : a quartet of place and memory
Author:
Olsen, W. Scott, 1958-
Publication Information:
Salt Lake City : University of Utah Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
308 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
When we say we're home / W. Scott Olsen -- Motel mind / Dawn Marano -- Map, Landscape, and story / Douglas Carlson -- Where I live(d) / Wendy Bishop.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780874805918

9780874805925
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library GT2420 .W44 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Four writers recount their ideas and experience of home. Olsen contributes the title essay; Dawn Marano considers the Motel Mind; Douglas Carlson discusses Map, Landscape, and Story; and Wendy Bishop remembers Where I Live(d). No index or bibliography. Paper edition (592-9), $19.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Summary

Four writers recount their ideas and experience of home. Olsen contributes the title essay; Dawn Marano considers the Motel Mind; Douglas Carlson discusses Map, Landscape, and Story; and Wendy Bishop remembers Where I Live(d). No index or bibliography. Paper edition (592-9), $19.95. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

This book joins the growing body of literature on sense of place, a theme that is centered on the loose construct of dwelling places as expressed in story. The quartet of authors found here offer a well-crafted assortment of essays with a mix of approaches: finding a sense of place, searching for a sense of self, escaping the prison of place and memory, and vigilantly building place and self as modern nomads seem to do through a haphazard blend of liaisons, profession, and chance. In particular, Olsen (English/environmental studies, Concordia Coll.) applies a blend of storytelling, memory, environment, and place that builds with the strength of a short story, while Wendy Bishop (creative writing, Florida State Univ.) incorporates poetry and magical language to capture the essence of a wide-ranging experience of location. Recommended for public and academic libraries, particularly those with collections of place, nature, and nonfiction literature.ÄSue Samson, Univ. of Montana Lib., Missoula (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Producing an essay each, these four writers are confounded by the concept of home. Their essays weave personal experiences of place, much as they weave formerly published pieces, into their memories of place. Their overwhelming sense of personalized place known as home is that "home" is a construct, created from memory and experience and solidified through story. The authors are unified in identifying personal experience as well as ecological sensibilities in their explorations about the character of home. They are also unified in dismissing the need to identify home with a physical location, although they all explore, narratively, their own physical homes. Above all, stories make a home. Whether of bitter divorces or of deep-rooted families, of one's children or one's own childhood, of hummingbirds or historic swamps, of north, south, east, or west, stories are what string each essay of personalized home tightly together. The idea that stories "lock in" a sense of home is also the universal foundation supporting all of these understandings of "home" and place. This fine, evocative book should stimulate college students and enliven most readers' own sense of what they understand home to be. For all levels. J. B. Wolford University of Missouri--St. Louis


Library Journal Review

This book joins the growing body of literature on sense of place, a theme that is centered on the loose construct of dwelling places as expressed in story. The quartet of authors found here offer a well-crafted assortment of essays with a mix of approaches: finding a sense of place, searching for a sense of self, escaping the prison of place and memory, and vigilantly building place and self as modern nomads seem to do through a haphazard blend of liaisons, profession, and chance. In particular, Olsen (English/environmental studies, Concordia Coll.) applies a blend of storytelling, memory, environment, and place that builds with the strength of a short story, while Wendy Bishop (creative writing, Florida State Univ.) incorporates poetry and magical language to capture the essence of a wide-ranging experience of location. Recommended for public and academic libraries, particularly those with collections of place, nature, and nonfiction literature.ÄSue Samson, Univ. of Montana Lib., Missoula (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Producing an essay each, these four writers are confounded by the concept of home. Their essays weave personal experiences of place, much as they weave formerly published pieces, into their memories of place. Their overwhelming sense of personalized place known as home is that "home" is a construct, created from memory and experience and solidified through story. The authors are unified in identifying personal experience as well as ecological sensibilities in their explorations about the character of home. They are also unified in dismissing the need to identify home with a physical location, although they all explore, narratively, their own physical homes. Above all, stories make a home. Whether of bitter divorces or of deep-rooted families, of one's children or one's own childhood, of hummingbirds or historic swamps, of north, south, east, or west, stories are what string each essay of personalized home tightly together. The idea that stories "lock in" a sense of home is also the universal foundation supporting all of these understandings of "home" and place. This fine, evocative book should stimulate college students and enliven most readers' own sense of what they understand home to be. For all levels. J. B. Wolford University of Missouri--St. Louis


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