Cover image for The dark heart of time
Title:
The dark heart of time
Author:
Farmer, Philip José.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Del Rey, 1999.
Physical Description:
278 pages ; 18 cm
General Note:
"A Tarzan novel"--Title page.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780345424631
Format :
Book

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Status
Central Library X Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

At last--after decades--one of the most famous heroes in literature is back! Tarzan, Lord of the Apes, returns with a vengeance in this brand-new, action-packed adventure by Philip José Farmer, Hugo Award-winning author of the incredible Riverworld saga. Tarzan's beloved mate, Jane, has been kidnapped, and the furious ape-man will let nothing stand in the way of rescuing her--not even a sinister safari whose target is Tarzan himself. With fierce Masai trackers leading the chase, a trio of white hunters are hellbent on capturing the Jungle Lord. But as the pursuers, and their uncanny half-human tracker, close in from behind, Tarzan races toward even greater danger ahead. For the trail leads to a bizarre, long-forgotten land boasting a multitude of strange and terrifying mysteries: the City Built by God, the Hideous Hunter, the One to Avoid, and most shocking of all, the Crystal Tree of Time--whose seductive powers could ultimately spell Tarzan's doom . . . Philip José Farmer, a descendant of the actual Greystoke family, is famous for his adventure novels starring Tarzan characters. Now, for the first time, he lends his vast imagination to the authorized legend of the Lord of the Apes himself!


Author Notes

Philip José Farmer was born in North Terre Haute, Indiana on January 26, 1918. He worked in a steel mill while attending Bradley University at night and writing in his spare time. In 1952, his story The Lovers, in which a human has sex with an alien, was published in a pulp magazine called Startling Stories and won him the Hugo Award in 1953 for most promising new author. He quit his job to become a full-time writer, but a string of misfortunes eventually forced him to take jobs as a manual laborer. He worked as a technical writer from 1956 to 1970, but continued writing science fiction.

He finally found success in the 1960's with the Riverworld series. He wrote more than 75 books throughout his lifetime including the Dayworld series and the World of Tiers series. He also wrote short stories. He won the Hugo award for best novella in 1968 for Riders of the Purple Wage and for best novel in 1972 for To Your Scattered Bodies Go. In 1988, he was the recipient of the Writers of the Past Award and the Nova for best book for Riverworld. In 2001 he was awarded the Grand Master Award and the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award. He died on February 25, 2009 at the age of 91.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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