Cover image for Rocket propulsion elements
Title:
Rocket propulsion elements
Author:
Sutton, George P. (George Paul), 1920-
Edition:
Seventh edition.
Publication Information:
New York : John Wiley & Sons, [2001]

©2001
Physical Description:
xv, 751 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
General Note:
"A Wiley-Interscience publication."
Language:
English
Subject Term:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780471326427
Format :
Book

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Call Number
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Status
Central Library TL782 .S8 2001 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Reference
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Summary

Summary

Aerospace Engineering/Mechanical Engineering
The definitive text on rocket propulsion-now completely revised to reflect rapid advancements in the field
For more than fifty years, this seminal text has been regarded as the single most authoritative sourcebook on rocket propulsion technology. More comprehensive and coherently organized than any other book on the subject, Rocket Propulsion Elements guides readers evenhandedly through the complex factors that shape propulsion, with both theory and practical design considerations.
With more than a third of the text and illustrations either completely new or extensively revised, this latest edition includes current information on engine structures, nozzle theory, gas properties, thrust chambers, launch vehicles, and more. With a detailed table of contents breaking down each chapter into subsections-as well as an expanded index of key words-the Seventh Edition efficiently steers readers quickly to the information they need. Other highlights include:
* Separate chapters on liquid, solid, and hybrid propulsion systems and a new chapter on thrust chambers including the new aerospike nozzle
* Comprehensive coverage of rocket propulsion technology, with applications to space flight, satellite flight, and guided and unguided missiles
* Problem-solving examples and exercises relevant to actual design situations
* More than 340 illustrations, including photographs, tables, and graphs
* Coherent, up-to-date chapter on electrical propulsion balancing fundamentals with practical aspects and applications
For professional engineers in the aerospace and defense industries as well as undergraduate and graduate students in mechanical and aerospace engineering, this time-honored resource is indispensable for its scope of coverage and utility.


Author Notes

Oscar Biblarz is a Professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xi
1 Classificationp. 1
1.1. Duct Jet Propulsionp. 2
1.2. Rocket Propulsionp. 4
1.3. Applications of Rocket Propulsionp. 15
Referencesp. 25
2 Definitions and Fundamentalsp. 27
2.1. Definitionp. 27
2.2. Thrustp. 32
2.3. Exhaust Velocityp. 34
2.4. Energy and Efficienciesp. 36
2.5. Typical Performance Valuesp. 39
Problemsp. 41
Symbolsp. 43
Referencesp. 44
3 Nozzle Theory and Thermodynamic Relationsp. 45
3.1. Ideal Rocketp. 46
3.2. Summary of Thermodynamic Relationsp. 47
3.3. Isentropic Flow through Nozzlesp. 52
3.4. Nozzle Configurationsp. 75
3.5. Real Nozzlesp. 85
3.6. Four Performance Parametersp. 92
3.7. Nozzle Alignmentp. 94
3.8. Variable Thrustp. 96
Problemsp. 97
Symbolsp. 99
Referencesp. 100
4 Flight Performancep. 102
4.1. Gravity-Free Drag-Free Space Flightp. 102
4.2. Forces Acting on a Vehicle in the Atmospherep. 106
4.3. Basic Relations of Motionp. 108
4.4. Effect of Propulsion System on Vehicle Performancep. 115
4.5. Space Flightp. 117
4.6. Flight Maneuversp. 132
4.7. Flight Vehiclesp. 139
4.8. Military Missilesp. 149
4.9. Aerodynamic Effect of Exhaust Plumesp. 152
4.10. Flight Stabilityp. 153
Problemsp. 154
Symbolsp. 157
Referencesp. 159
5 Chemical Rocket Propellant Performance Analysisp. 160
5.1. Background and Fundamentalsp. 161
5.2. Analysis of Chamber or Motor Case Conditionsp. 169
5.3. Analysis of Nozzle Expansion Processesp. 172
5.4. Computer Analysisp. 179
5.5. Results of Thermochemical Calculationsp. 180
Problemsp. 189
Symbolsp. 193
Referencesp. 195
6 Liquid Propellant Rocket Engine Fundamentalsp. 197
6.1. Propellantsp. 201
6.2. Propellant Feed Systemsp. 203
6.3. Gas Pressure Feed Systemsp. 205
6.4. Propellant Tanksp. 211
6.5. Tank Pressurizationp. 218
6.6. Turbopump Feed Systems and Engine Cyclesp. 221
6.7. Flow and Pressure Balancep. 227
6.8. Rocket Engines for Maneuvering, Orbit Adjustments, or Attitude Controlp. 228
6.9. Valves and Pipe Linesp. 232
6.10. Engine Support Structurep. 235
Problemsp. 236
Symbolsp. 238
Referencesp. 239
7 Liquid Propellantsp. 241
7.1. Propellant Propertiesp. 242
7.2. Liquid Oxidizersp. 251
7.3. Liquid Fuelsp. 255
7.4. Liquid Monopropellantsp. 259
7.5. Gelled Propellantsp. 261
7.6. Gaseous Propellantsp. 263
7.7. Safety and Environmental Concernsp. 264
Problemsp. 265
Symbolsp. 266
Referencesp. 266
8 Thrust Chambersp. 268
8.1. Injectorsp. 271
8.2. Combustion Chamber and Nozzlep. 282
8.3. Heat Transfer Analysisp. 308
8.4. Starting and Ignitionp. 320
8.5. Variable Thrustp. 323
8.6. Sample Thrust Chamber Design Analysisp. 324
Problemsp. 335
Symbolsp. 338
Referencesp. 340
9 Combustion of Liquid Propellantsp. 342
9.1. Combustion Processp. 343
9.2. Analysis and Simulationp. 346
9.3. Combustion Instabilityp. 348
Problemsp. 360
Referencesp. 360
10 Turbopumps, Engine Design, Engine Controls, Calibration, Integration, and Optimizationp. 362
10.1. Turbopumpsp. 362
10.2. Performance of Complete or Multiple Rocket Propulsion Systemsp. 384
10.3. Propellant Budgetp. 387
10.4. Engine Designp. 389
10.5. Engine Controlsp. 396
10.6. Engine System Calibrationp. 405
10.7. System Integration and Engine Optimizationp. 411
Problemsp. 413
Symbolsp. 413
Referencesp. 415
11 Solid Propellant Rocket Fundamentalsp. 417
11.1. Propellant Burning Ratep. 419
11.2. Basic Performance Relationsp. 437
11.3. Propellant Grain and Grain Configurationp. 444
11.4. Propellant Grain Stress and Strainp. 453
11.5. Attitude Control and Side Maneuvers with Solid Propellant Rocket Motorsp. 466
Problemsp. 467
Symbolsp. 470
Referencesp. 471
12 Solid Propellantsp. 474
12.1. Classificationp. 474
12.2. Propellant Characteristicsp. 480
12.3. Hazardsp. 487
12.4. Propellant Ingredientsp. 494
12.5. Other Propellant Categoriesp. 505
12.6. Liners, Insulators, and Inhibitorsp. 509
12.7. Propellant Processing and Manufacturep. 511
Problemsp. 515
Referencesp. 518
13 Combustion of Solid Propellantsp. 520
13.1. Physical and Chemical Processesp. 520
13.2. Ignition Processp. 524
13.3. Extinction or Thrust Terminationp. 526
13.4. Combustion Instabilityp. 528
Problemsp. 537
Referencesp. 537
14 Solid Rocket Components and Motor Designp. 540
14.1. Motor Casep. 540
14.2. Nozzlep. 550
14.3. Igniter Hardwarep. 563
14.4. Rocket Motor Design Approachp. 568
Problemsp. 575
Referencesp. 577
15 Hybrid Propellant Rocketsp. 579
15.1. Applications and Propellantsp. 580
15.2. Performance Analysis and Grain Configurationp. 585
15.3. Design Examplep. 593
15.4. Combustion Instabilityp. 599
Symbolsp. 604
Referencesp. 606
16 Thrust Vector Controlp. 608
16.1. TVC Mechanisms with a Single Nozzlep. 609
16.2. TVC with Multiple Thrust Chambers or Nozzlesp. 620
16.3. Testingp. 621
16.4. Integration with Vehiclep. 621
Referencesp. 623
17 Selection of Rocket Propulsion Systemsp. 624
17.1. Selection Processp. 625
17.2. Criteria for Selectionp. 630
17.3. Interfacesp. 634
Referencesp. 638
18 Rocket Exhaust Plumesp. 639
18.1. Plume Appearance and Flow Behaviorp. 641
18.2. Plume Effectsp. 652
18.3. Analysis and Mathematical Simulationp. 657
Problemsp. 658
Referencesp. 658
19 Electric Propulsionp. 660
19.1. Ideal Flight Performancep. 666
19.2. Electrothermal Thrustersp. 670
19.3. Non-Thermal Electric Thrustersp. 677
19.4. Optimum Flight Performancep. 696
19.5. Mission Applicationsp. 700
19.6. Electric Space-Power Supplies and Power-Conditioning Systemsp. 701
Problemsp. 706
Symbolsp. 707
Referencesp. 709
20 Rocket Testingp. 711
20.1. Types of Testsp. 711
20.2. Test Facilities and Safeguardsp. 713
20.3. Instrumentation and Data Managementp. 720
20.4. Flight Testingp. 724
20.5. Postaccident Proceduresp. 725
Referencesp. 726
Appendix 1 Conversion Factors and Constantsp. 727
Appendix 2 Properties of the Earth's Standard Atmospherep. 730
Appendix 3 Summary of Key Equations for Ideal Chemical Rocketsp. 731
Appendix 4 Derivation of Hybrid Fuel Regression Rate Equation in Chapter 15p. 733
Appendix 5 Alternative Interpretations of Boundary Layer Blowing Coefficient in Chapter 15p. 737
Indexp. 739

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