Cover image for Greed is good : the capitalist pig guide to investing
Title:
Greed is good : the capitalist pig guide to investing
Author:
Hoenig, Jonathan.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperBusiness, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xix, 250 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780887309847
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HG4910 .H585 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Money is important. Money is a catalyst. Money makes things happen.

Am I right? What is more powerful than money? Love? Food? Not a chance: With cash in hand, one can simply order out. For both.

I grew up in the 1980s, so I take the utmost pride in having lived in what I honestly believe to be the greatest decade of the twentieth century. Why? From the Police to Perestroika, the `80s had it all. It's obvious that as a generation, most of our feelings about money were formed at a time when Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous, Michael Milken, and Yuppie culture reigned supreme.

Enter the `90s--and once again the stock market is booming. Now older, most of us have amassed some cash for the very first time. You want to get in on the action, but haven't got a clue where to start. More than anything, you are unique--the last thing you need is a middle-aged money manager telling you where to stow your stash.

So here's the deal: I'm twenty-three years old, obsessed with money and the stock market, a radio talk-show host, and a commodities trader. I've made money in everything from mutual funds to stocks--even options and futures. I've penned this little...shall we say, manifesto, for those of you out there who want something more out of life then two-for-one night at the Toss `n Sauce. Greed Is Good will tell you everything you need to know about the major financial "products" out there: from mutual funds to money markets, even the sexy stuff like options and futures.

Money is important, but I think this book makes an oftentimes dry subject a mite more palatable. I had to sit through the boring stuff, no reason you should too. Bottom line? This book is a practical but punchy ride through the money maze. And if I found my way out--so can you.


Author Notes

Before Jonathan Hoenig could drive, he was trading stocks and options. By the time he could buy alcohol, he was advising fellow students on achieving financial success. Today, he is the host and producer of "Capitalist Pig," the first radio program dedicated to the financial needs of eighteen- to thirty-five-year-olds. A trader on the Chicago Board of Trade, he also writes a monthly financial column for P.O.V. magazine and serves as a regular commentator on PRI's "Marketplace." Hoenig has consulted with companies such as Visa and Van Kampen Funds and has been profiled on MTV, CNN, Fox News, and in the pages of such publications as Institutional Investor and the Wall Street Journal.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Given the "slacker" stereotype perpetuated for so-called Generation Xers, it is certainly ironic that adults under the age of 33 are saving at a much higher rate than their "boomer" brothers and sisters. According to the Retirement Confidence Survey, more than 19 percent of this younger group have already set aside $50,000 or more. Beth Kobliner broadly targeted these savers with Get a Financial Life (1996), her cover-all-the-bases guide to financial planning. Now Hoenig zeros in with this advice strictly on investing. Only 23, Hoenig obviously knows how to get the attention of others in his age group. In 1996, he developed a personal finance talk show called Capitalist Pig for Northwestern University's student-run radio station. Since then, the program has expanded to two hours and can be heard in 18 states. Hoenig's approach is decidedly youthful and irreverent. Underneath the fun and games, though, his advice is thorough, sensible, and conservative. He focuses on stocks, bonds, and mutual funds, but he also introduces options and futures trading. --David Rouse


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Preface Prepare for Pigp. x
Part 1 Prepping
1 Greed Is Goodp. 2
2 Just Say No: Debtp. 10
3 Starting with Savingp. 23
Part 2 Investing
4 Investing In Slo Mop. 44
5 Cash Is Kingp. 73
6 Bring on the Bondsp. 89
7 Stocks as an Investmentp. 118
8 Behold: Stock Market Mutual Fundsp. 140
Part 3 Speculating
9 Introduction to Speculatingp. 164
10 Stock Speculationp. 178
11 Know Your Optionsp. 206
12 Futuresp. 222
Conclusionp. 237
Indexp. 241

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