Cover image for How to write poetry
Title:
How to write poetry
Author:
Janeczko, Paul B.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Scholastic Reference, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
ix, 117 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Summary:
Provides practical advice with checklists on the art of writing poetry.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
910 Lexile.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 6-8 6.1 6 Quiz: 22644 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780590100779
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN1059.A9 J36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
Searching...
Newstead Library PN1059.A9 J36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Boston Free Library PN1059.A9 J36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Clearfield Library PN1059.A9 J36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Dudley Branch Library PN1059.A9 J36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
East Aurora Library PN1059.A9 J36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Audubon Library PN1059.A9 J36 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Provides practical advice with checklists on the art of writing poetry.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-8. Since his groundbreaking Poetspeak (1983), Janeczko has written several books about poetry for young people, always in an informal, personal voice that combines great poetry with talk about how to enjoy it and how to write your own. In Poetry from A to Z: A Guide for Young Writers (1994), his focus is on the poems, and the commentary is short. In this accessible book in the Scholastic Guides series, there is less poetry and more discussion, though individual poems--by famous poets and by student writers--serve as examples throughout. Whether the topic is keeping a journal, writing free verse and rhyming verse, or revising a poem, Janeczko is clearly drawing straight from his writing classes with young people. His open, enthusiastic voice will speak to the individual beginning poet as well as to creative-writing groups. He does what he says (uses lots of vivid, specific details in simple ordinary language), and he shares the joy, wonder, and music of words. The book design is open and readable, and each chapter is broken up with suggestions ("Try this"), with writing tips from poets, and with longer discussions on the technique of "Poetcraft," from sound effects to figurative language. The book ends with a detailed glossary, biographical notes, and an excellent bibliography of good poetry. (Reviewed March 15, 1999)0590100777Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-In this practical and inspiring guide, Janeczko leads would-be poets through the writing process by beginning with the basics: looking for ideas, keeping a journal, and reading all types of poems. The next step is to start writing some simple poems to get used to the sounds words make when they are put together. The author suggests acrostic poems or short rhyming pieces such as synonym poems or clerihews (short rhymes about celebrities). Finally, writers are encouraged to move on to more advanced forms of free verse, including list poems, persona poems, and narrative poems. Interspersed throughout the text are tips from well-known poets, numerous examples, and writing exercises. Janeczko explains the writing techniques so well that young people will be tempted to pick up a pen and create some of their own work. The text is never intimidating; the tone is encouraging and supportive of taking risks with writing. An excellent glossary and "A Checklist of Good Poetry Books" are appended and the crisp, clear design is appealing. This book will be useful for students who are faced with poetry writing assignments but most especially for those who just want to explore the topic for their own pleasure.-Kristen Oravec, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Strongsville, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview