Cover image for King Midas and the golden touch
Title:
King Midas and the golden touch
Author:
Craft, Charlotte.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Morrow Junior Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
A king finds himself bitterly regretting the consequences of his wish that everything he touches would turn to gold.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 660 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.7 0.5 70864.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780688131654

9780688131661
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
East Aurora Library BL820.M55 C73 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Hamburg Library BL820.M55 C73 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library BL820.M55 C73 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library BL820.M55 C73 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Orchard Park Library BL820.M55 C73 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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City of Tonawanda Library BL820.M55 C73 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library BL820.M55 C73 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Dudley Branch Library BL820.M55 C73 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

King Midas is a goodman, and he is adevoted father to hisdaughter, Aurelia. Yet Midasknows no music sweeter than therattling of golden coins, and themore gold he gathers, the morehe desires. When a mysteriousstranger offers to grant the kinga single wish as a reward for akindness, Midas does not hesi-tate: He wishes that all hetouches would turn to gold. Butall too soon, he learns that whatat first seems a blessing can alsobecome a curse.

The legendary man with the magic touch comes alive as a remarkably complex figure in this breathtaking new vision of perhaps the most universal of all Greek myths. Kinuko Y. Craft's radiant paintings glow with human drama, natural beauty, and golden splendor.

King Midas is not a cruel man, but his passion for gold surpasses all else, save his love for his daughter. If only everything he touched would turn to gold! When Midas is granted that single wish, he rejoices -- until he nearly loses his beloved child to his greed. Here is a skillfully retold story of extraordinary resonance and wisdom, with a message no reader will soon forget. Radiant paintings glow with luxurious, golden, splendor.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 6^-8. Lavishly illustrated in a romantic style, this picture book tells the story of King Midas and the golden touch. The author acknowledges as her inspiration Nathaniel Hawthorne's retelling of the Greek myth, though adults will discern a Victorian influence in the sweet, rather sentimental portrait of the king's daughter. Artist Craft "has been influenced by other sources," citing her use of eighth-century Anatolian artifacts for geometric motifs and the Middle Ages as a setting for the tale. Children will find the book a clear, smoothly written version of the story, accompanied by richly colored and elaborately detailed scenes of grandeur, drama, and magic. --Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

The mother-daughter duo that produced Cupid and Psyche sumptuously interprets a familiar Greek myth. A note at the beginning explains that the text is inspired by Nathaniel Hawthorne's retelling, and it is structured like a fairy tale. Midas's kindness to a stranger earns him his ill-fated wish; Midas's love for his daughter inspires his remorse; and in the end, he is magically redeemed. The author writes fluidly and capaciously, invoking castle rose gardens and secret chambers of treasure. The lavish oil-over-watercolor paintings, said to be set in the Middle Ages, make overtures to the Renaissance in their lush compositional style and the characters' costumes. As Kinuko Craft's admirers will expect, her attention to detail is unflagging: embroidered, jeweled clothes almost seem to rustle, and the palace's columns, stairways and arches form dizzying arcades. At first her gold palette dazzles, but as the insidious gilt trail extinguishes the vibrant range of colors, the dark side of Midas's supposed good fortune is manifested as clearly in the pictures as in the text. A regal treatment. Ages 5-up. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-Like the previous Craft collaboration, Cupid and Psyche (Morrow, 1996), this gloriously and elaborately illustrated Midas is faithful to the myth (in Hawthorne's redaction). A sharp eye will spot a few Anatolian visual clues in an otherwise baroquely splendid fantasy of a medieval court, rendered in meticulous detail. Excess never looked better. Libraries with budgets of gold might want both this volume and John Stewig's King Midas (Holiday, 1999), illustrated by Omar Rayyan: they make a fascinating and instructive pair. Lacking the Midas touch, librarians must choose between the essentially conservative Craft approach, as unsurprising and toothsome as Turkish delight, and Stewig's much more flavorful and inventive recipe. If readers want the Hollywood spectacular, Craft is for them, but the innovative team of Stewig and Rayyan would get my vote in a heartbeat.-Patricia Lothrop-Green, St. George's School, Newport, RI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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