Cover image for Narratives of African American art and identity : the David C. Driskell collection.
Title:
Narratives of African American art and identity : the David C. Driskell collection.
Author:
Gips, Terry, 1945-
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
College Park, Md. : The Art Gallery and the Department of Art History and Archaeology, University of Maryland ; San Francisco : Pomegranate, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
192 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 31 cm
General Note:
Catalog of a traveling exhibition first held at the Art Gallery of the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, Oct. 22-Dec. 19, 1998.

Written by Terry Gips and others.
Language:
English
Contents:
David C. Driskell / Terry Gips -- Tribute / Stephanie E. Pogue -- Acknowledgements / M. Colleen Chapman -- Introduction : Driskell the collector / Keith Morrison -- The color of art : African American artistic identities in the twentieth century / Juanita M. Holland -- A history of collecting African American art / Sharon F. Patton -- In the archive and the garden / Richard J. Powell -- The David Driskell motives / Allan M. Gordon -- The David C. Driskell collection : object entries / Adrienne L. Childs ... [et al.] -- Artists' chronologies / Adrienne L. Childs and Tuliz Fleming.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780764907227

9780764906893
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N6538.N5 N27 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

One of the most exciting and eclectic celebrations of African American art ever published, Narratives of African American Art and Identity showcases one hundred paintings, etchings, sculptures, and photographs from the collection of David C. Driskell. A true Renaissance man, Driskell himself is an esteemed artist, educator, curator, and philanthropist. His fifty-year career has been committed to promoting African American art.Included are works by John Biggers, Sam Gilliam, Lois Mailou Jones, Keith Morrison, Henry Ossawa Tanner, Alma Thomas, Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, Augusta Savage, and James VanDerZee -- to name just a few. Each artwork is accompanied by information about the artist and the particular work.This book is the catalog for the exhibition of the same title, which travelled to various American museums through February 2001.


Summary

Cassie Barrett, a world-renowned anthropologist, wakes up in a graveyard and doesn't know who she is. Taken in for a few days by William Flying Horse, a Native American police officer, she waits for her life to re-appear. When Hollywood heartthrob Alex Rivers shows up to claim her as his wife, she is stunned but still doesn't remember anything.After she returns to her fairytale existence as Alex Rivers' wife, fragments of memory come back but she senses there is a side to her husband that she can't remember. When she finds a positive pregnancy test hidden in her bathroom, dark memories return, allowing her to piece together her past. Frightened, she runs to the only person she trusts to keep her hidden: Will.Jodi Picoult's story is a tapestry rich in detail and emotion, a beautifully written novel that will deeply reward, and perhaps inspire, its listeners.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

A pioneering figure in African American art history, Driskell has been honored on his retirement from the University of Maryland with an exhibition of selected works from his seminal collection. This accompanying catalog is intended as an homage to Driskell as scholar, teacher, artist, patron, and collector. The selected works were created from the mid-1800s to the early 1990s and are here grouped into historical periods based on the content of the art and what they say about the social, ethnic, and creative roles of the artists. Unique emphasis is placed on the influence of African American art teachers and institutions in fostering the development of black art. Essays by distinguished scholars provide background to the collection; especially interesting is Sharon Patton's history of African American art collecting. Narratives notes that Alma Thomas (1891-1978) "contradicted assumptions about appropriate subject matter and styles for African American artists [and]...rejected suggestions that she paint `black' subjects." The Fort Wayne Museum, IN, exhibition and catalog of over 50 of her paintings clearly demonstrates that Thomas's work is firmly rooted in the modernist tradition of abstractionÄwith emphasis on vibrant colors generating geometric forms set in dynamic compositions. Four scholarly essays explicate her work and unique role in modern American art as a black woman artist. Both of these volumes are highly recommended for libraries with an interest in art and/or ethnic studies.ÄEugene C. Burt, Art Inst. of Seattle Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

A pioneering figure in African American art history, Driskell has been honored on his retirement from the University of Maryland with an exhibition of selected works from his seminal collection. This accompanying catalog is intended as an homage to Driskell as scholar, teacher, artist, patron, and collector. The selected works were created from the mid-1800s to the early 1990s and are here grouped into historical periods based on the content of the art and what they say about the social, ethnic, and creative roles of the artists. Unique emphasis is placed on the influence of African American art teachers and institutions in fostering the development of black art. Essays by distinguished scholars provide background to the collection; especially interesting is Sharon Patton's history of African American art collecting. Narratives notes that Alma Thomas (1891-1978) "contradicted assumptions about appropriate subject matter and styles for African American artists [and]...rejected suggestions that she paint `black' subjects." The Fort Wayne Museum, IN, exhibition and catalog of over 50 of her paintings clearly demonstrates that Thomas's work is firmly rooted in the modernist tradition of abstractionÄwith emphasis on vibrant colors generating geometric forms set in dynamic compositions. Four scholarly essays explicate her work and unique role in modern American art as a black woman artist. Both of these volumes are highly recommended for libraries with an interest in art and/or ethnic studies.ÄEugene C. Burt, Art Inst. of Seattle Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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