Cover image for An introduction to visual culture
Title:
An introduction to visual culture
Author:
Mirzoeff, Nicholas, 1962-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London ; New York : Routledge, 1999.
Physical Description:
xi, 274 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780415158756

9780415158763
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library P93.5 .M57 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

This is a wide-ranging and stimulating introduction to the history and theory of visual culture from painting to the computer and television screen. It will prove indispensable to students of art and art history as well as students of cultural studies.
Mirzoeff begins by defining what visual culture is, and explores how and why visual media - fine art, cinema, the Internet, advertising, performance, photography, television - have become so central to contemporary everyday life. He argues that the visual is replacing the linguistic as our primary means of communicating with each other and of understanding our postmodern world.
Part One of the Introduction presents a history of modern ways of seeing, including:
* the formal practices of line and colour in painting
* photographys claim to represent reality
* virtual reality, from the nineteenth century to the present.
In Part Two, Mirzoeff examines:
* the visualization of race, sexuality and human identity in culture
* gender and sexuality and questions of the gaze in visual culture
* representations of encounters with the other, from colonial narratives to Science Fiction texts such as The Thing, Independence Day, Star Trek and The X-Files
* the death of Princess Diana and the popular mourning which followed as marking the coming of age of a global visualized culture.


Summary

This is a wide-ranging and stimulating introduction to the history and theory of visual culture from painting to the computer and television screen. It will prove indispensable to students of art and art history as well as students of cultural studies.
Mirzoeff begins by defining what visual culture is, and explores how and why visual media - fine art, cinema, the Internet, advertising, performance, photography, television - have become so central to contemporary everyday life. He argues that the visual is replacing the linguistic as our primary means of communicating with each other and of understanding our postmodern world.
Part One of the Introduction presents a history of modern ways of seeing, including:
* the formal practices of line and colour in painting
* photographys claim to represent reality
* virtual reality, from the nineteenth century to the present.
In Part Two, Mirzoeff examines:
* the visualization of race, sexuality and human identity in culture
* gender and sexuality and questions of the gaze in visual culture
* representations of encounters with the other, from colonial narratives to Science Fiction texts such as The Thing, Independence Day, Star Trek and The X-Files
* the death of Princess Diana and the popular mourning which followed as marking the coming of age of a global visualized culture.


Table of Contents

List of illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introduction: What is visual culture?p. 1
Visualizingp. 5
Visual Power, Visual Pleasurep. 9
Visualityp. 13
Culturep. 22
Everyday Lifep. 26
Part 1 Visualityp. 35
1 Picture definition: Line, color, visionp. 37
Perspectivesp. 38
Discipline and Colorp. 51
Normalizing Color: Color Blindnessp. 53
Light Over Colorp. 55
Whitep. 58
Codap. 62
2 The age of photography (1839-1982)p. 65
The Death of Paintingp. 65
The Birth of the Democratic Imagep. 71
Death and Photographyp. 73
From Photo Noir to Post-Photographyp. 78
The Death of Photographyp. 88
3 Virtuality: From virtual antiquity to the pixel zonep. 91
Interfaces with Virtualityp. 92
Virtuality Goes Globalp. 96
Telesublimep. 99
Virtual Realityp. 101
Virtual Reality and Everyday Lifep. 104
Virtual Identityp. 107
Net Lifep. 111
More Pixels Anyone?p. 114
Virtual Bodiesp. 116
Part 2 Culturep. 127
4 Transculture: From Kongo to the Congop. 129
Inventing the Heart of Darknessp. 132
Resistance Through Ritualp. 147
Cultural Memoryp. 153
New Visions from the Congop. 156
5 Seeing sexp. 162
Fetishizing the Gazep. 163
From Inversion to Opposites and Ambiguityp. 167
Seeing Female Sexp. 170
Mixing: the Cultural Politics of Race and Reproductionp. 174
Queering the Gaze: Roger Casement's Eyesp. 183
6 First contact: From Independence Day to 1492 and Millenniump. 193
Enter the Extraterrestialsp. 194
The Return of the Empirep. 202
Aliens as Evilp. 207
Trekkingp. 211
TV Past and Presentp. 222
Part 3 Global/Localp. 229
7 Diana's death: Gender, photography and the inauguration of global visual culturep. 231
Popularity and Cultural Studiesp. 232
Photography and the Princessp. 235
Pictures in Indiap. 237
The Celebrity Punctump. 240
Flags and Protocol: the Devil in the Detailp. 244
Death and the Maiden: the Sign of New Britainp. 247
Pixel Planetp. 248
Coda:Firep. 255
Indexp. 261
List of illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introduction: What is visual culture?p. 1
Visualizingp. 5
Visual Power, Visual Pleasurep. 9
Visualityp. 13
Culturep. 22
Everyday Lifep. 26
Part 1 Visualityp. 35
1 Picture definition: Line, color, visionp. 37
Perspectivesp. 38
Discipline and Colorp. 51
Normalizing Color: Color Blindnessp. 53
Light Over Colorp. 55
Whitep. 58
Codap. 62
2 The age of photography (1839-1982)p. 65
The Death of Paintingp. 65
The Birth of the Democratic Imagep. 71
Death and Photographyp. 73
From Photo Noir to Post-Photographyp. 78
The Death of Photographyp. 88
3 Virtuality: From virtual antiquity to the pixel zonep. 91
Interfaces with Virtualityp. 92
Virtuality Goes Globalp. 96
Telesublimep. 99
Virtual Realityp. 101
Virtual Reality and Everyday Lifep. 104
Virtual Identityp. 107
Net Lifep. 111
More Pixels Anyone?p. 114
Virtual Bodiesp. 116
Part 2 Culturep. 127
4 Transculture: From Kongo to the Congop. 129
Inventing the Heart of Darknessp. 132
Resistance Through Ritualp. 147
Cultural Memoryp. 153
New Visions from the Congop. 156
5 Seeing sexp. 162
Fetishizing the Gazep. 163
From Inversion to Opposites and Ambiguityp. 167
Seeing Female Sexp. 170
Mixing: the Cultural Politics of Race and Reproductionp. 174
Queering the Gaze: Roger Casement's Eyesp. 183
6 First contact: From Independence Day to 1492 and Millenniump. 193
Enter the Extraterrestialsp. 194
The Return of the Empirep. 202
Aliens as Evilp. 207
Trekkingp. 211
TV Past and Presentp. 222
Part 3 Global/Localp. 229
7 Diana's death: Gender, photography and the inauguration of global visual culturep. 231
Popularity and Cultural Studiesp. 232
Photography and the Princessp. 235
Pictures in Indiap. 237
The Celebrity Punctump. 240
Flags and Protocol: the Devil in the Detailp. 244
Death and the Maiden: the Sign of New Britainp. 247
Pixel Planetp. 248
Coda:Firep. 255
Indexp. 261

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