Cover image for The anthropology of food and body : gender, meaning, and power
Title:
The anthropology of food and body : gender, meaning, and power
Author:
Counihan, Carole, 1948-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Routledge, 1999.
Physical Description:
viii, 256 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780415921923

9780415921930
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
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Status
Central Library GT2850 .C68 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The Anthropology of Food and Body explores the way that making, eating, and thinking about food reveal culturally determined gender-power relations in diverse societies. This book brings feminist and anthropological theories to bear on these provocative issues and will interest anyone investigating the relationship between food, the body, and cultural notions of gender.


Summary

The Anthropology of Food and Body explores the way that making, eating, and thinking about food reveal culturally determined gender-power relations in diverse societies. This book brings feminist and anthropological theories to bear on these provocative issues and will interest anyone investigating the relationship between food, the body, and cultural notions of gender.


Author Notes

Carole M. Counihan is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Women's Studies at Millersville University. She is co-editor of Food and Culture (Routledge, 1997), and of Food and Gender: Identity and Power (1998).


Reviews 2

Choice Review

This collection serves as a retrospective of Counihan's research over the past 20 years, chronicling her evolving interest in the anthropological study of food and culture. Both anthropological and feminist, the essays, many of them previously published, should be of special interest to readers in women's studies, gender studies, and foods-and-nutrition studies. Counihan's discussions of fasting, anorexia, and attitudes toward food and eating, set in the contexts of gender, self-image, and power relations in both the US and Italy, are important contributions. A first chapter provides a review of the literature. The next few chapters describe studies of modernization, shifting roles and responsibilities, and the relationship between food and sex, autonomy and integrity, power and control in Sardinia. Other chapters focus on eating disorders and fasting, and how both of these behaviors may be linked to power and powerlessness. Counihan also explores changes in women's attitudes toward food, eating, and their bodies in Italy, while a fascinating study of attitudes toward eating and weight during pregnancy in the US rounds out the picture, bringing to the foreground questions of the contexts in which women "construct" their bodily images. Excellent bibliography and, for lagniappe, some very intriguing recipes from Counihan's Italian field research. All levels. H. J. Ottenheimer; Kansas State University


Choice Review

This collection serves as a retrospective of Counihan's research over the past 20 years, chronicling her evolving interest in the anthropological study of food and culture. Both anthropological and feminist, the essays, many of them previously published, should be of special interest to readers in women's studies, gender studies, and foods-and-nutrition studies. Counihan's discussions of fasting, anorexia, and attitudes toward food and eating, set in the contexts of gender, self-image, and power relations in both the US and Italy, are important contributions. A first chapter provides a review of the literature. The next few chapters describe studies of modernization, shifting roles and responsibilities, and the relationship between food and sex, autonomy and integrity, power and control in Sardinia. Other chapters focus on eating disorders and fasting, and how both of these behaviors may be linked to power and powerlessness. Counihan also explores changes in women's attitudes toward food, eating, and their bodies in Italy, while a fascinating study of attitudes toward eating and weight during pregnancy in the US rounds out the picture, bringing to the foreground questions of the contexts in which women "construct" their bodily images. Excellent bibliography and, for lagniappe, some very intriguing recipes from Counihan's Italian field research. All levels. H. J. Ottenheimer; Kansas State University


Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 Food, Culture and Gender
2 Bread as World: Food Habits and Social Relations in Modernizing Sardinia
3 Food, Power, and Female Identity in Contemporary France
4 Food, Sex, and Reproduction: Penetration of Gender Boundaries
5 What Does It Mean to Be Fat, Thin, and Female? A Review Essay
6 An Anthropological View of Western Women's Prodigious Fasting: A Review Essay
7 Food Rules in the United States: Individualism, Control, and Hierarchy
8 Fantasy Food: Gender and Food Symbolism in Preschool Children's Made-Up Stories
9 Food as Tie and Rupture: Negotiating Intimacy and Autonomy in the Florentine Family
10 The Body as Voice of Desire and Connection in Florence, Italy
11 Body and Power in Women's Experiences of Reproduction in the United States
Notes
Bibliography Recipes
Index
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 Food, Culture and Gender
2 Bread as World: Food Habits and Social Relations in Modernizing Sardinia
3 Food, Power, and Female Identity in Contemporary France
4 Food, Sex, and Reproduction: Penetration of Gender Boundaries
5 What Does It Mean to Be Fat, Thin, and Female? A Review Essay
6 An Anthropological View of Western Women's Prodigious Fasting: A Review Essay
7 Food Rules in the United States: Individualism, Control, and Hierarchy
8 Fantasy Food: Gender and Food Symbolism in Preschool Children's Made-Up Stories
9 Food as Tie and Rupture: Negotiating Intimacy and Autonomy in the Florentine Family
10 The Body as Voice of Desire and Connection in Florence, Italy
11 Body and Power in Women's Experiences of Reproduction in the United States
Notes
Bibliography Recipes
Index

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