Cover image for My heart is on the ground : the diary of Nannie Little Rose, a Sioux girl
Title:
My heart is on the ground : the diary of Nannie Little Rose, a Sioux girl
Author:
Rinaldi, Ann.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
205 pages : illustrations, maps ; 20 cm.
Summary:
In the diary account of her life at a government-run Pennsylvania boarding school in 1880, a twelve-year-old Sioux Indian girl reveals a great need to find a way to help her people.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
700 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.3 5.0 31191.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.2 10 Quiz: 13859 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780590149228
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

An acclaimed historical novelist makes her Dear America debut with the 1880 diary of a Sioux girl who is sent to a government-run boarding school in Pennsylvania to learn the white man's customs and language.


Author Notes

Young adult author Ann Rinaldi was born in New York City on August 27, 1934. After high school, she became a secretary in the business world. She got married in 1960 and stopped working, but after having two children she decided to try writing. In 1969, she wrote a weekly column in the Somerset Messenger Gazette and in 1970 she wrote two columns a week for the Trentonian, which eventually led to her writing features and soft new stories. She published her first novel Term Paper in 1979, but was ultimately drawn to writing historical fiction when her son became involved in reenactments while he was in high school. Her first historical fiction novel was Time Enough for Drums. She also writes for the Dear America series. She currently lives in Somerville, New Jersey with her husband.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-6. In a "diar-ee" form, written in broken English that realistically grows more polished as the story continues, 12-year-old Nannie Little Rose reflects on her life as a Sioux girl living at a Pennsylvania boarding school for Indian children. Rinaldi draws on material she unearthed about Richard Henry Platt's Indian School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania (including stories that appeared in the school's newspaper), to give face to Nannie, whose journal begins on December 1, 1897, and ends the following year in October, when she decides to become a teacher to help her people. The entries are a poignant mix of past and present--Nannie's life with her family, encounters with other students, the horrific death of a friend, the efforts of both well-meaning and misguided adults. They burst with details about culture and custom, adding wonderful texture to this thought-provoking book, which raises numerous questions as it depicts the frustration, the joy, and the confusion of one of yesterday's children growing up in two cultures. A solid addition to the Dear America series. For a similar story, try Shirley Sterling's My Name Is Seepeetza (1997). --Stephanie Zvirin


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-As a potential translator and bridge between two cultures, Nannie Little Rose is assigned by her teacher at the Carlisle Indian School to keep a diary in order to practice and improve her English skills. Beginning in broken English, Nannie tells of her incredibly difficult first year at the school, including entries detailing her previous life as her ability to communicate in English grows. From December, 1879, to October, 1880, readers follow a remarkably resilient girl, uprooted from her home and culture, trying to find a place for herself in a rapidly changing world. Loyal, caring, and creative, she is able to see a spirit helper in a kitchen mouse and willing to defy regulations in mourning the death of her dearest friend. Rinaldi depicts widely divergent cultures with clarity and compassion. Captain Pratt, founder of a school that forcibly strips children of their native culture, also provides vocational training and field trips, and responds to his students as true individuals. The body of the text is followed by an epilogue telling of Nannie's later life, an extensive historical note, and black-and-white photos. The period, the setting, and Nannie herself all come to life. An excellent addition to a popular series.-Faith Brautigam, Gail Borden Public Library, Elgin, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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