Cover image for The last snake in Ireland : a story about St. Patrick
Title:
The last snake in Ireland : a story about St. Patrick
Author:
MacGill-Callahan, Sheila.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Holiday House, 1999.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
Before he becomes a saint, Patrick drives all the snakes but one out of Ireland and that last one he throws into Scotland's Loch Ness.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780823414253
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.1.M1715 LAS 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Patrick is challenged when he tries to rid Ireland of its last snake.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4-7. MacGill-Callahan uses the legend of St. Patrick and the snakes as a jumping-off point for a tale about one snake that gets left behind. After ridding Ireland of snakes, St. Patrick is perturbed to find that one enormous red snake remains. He tries to catch the slithery one in a homemade box, but the snake outsmarts him. The contest of wills winds up with the serpent being dropped in Loch Ness and rather predictably growing up to be the Loch Ness monster. An author's note explains how MacGill-Callahan decided to mix Irish and Scottish lore. The telling itself is pleasant, though not as dynamic as it might be, and the artwork, too, executed in pastel shades (except for that bright red snake) also seems rather subdued for such a potentially lively story. This will be a choice for larger collections, except where legends of St. Patrick might be in demand. (Reviewed March 15, 1999)0823414256Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Just in time for the March 17th holiday comes a legend of Ireland's most charming snake wrangler, St. Patrick. Centuries ago, Patrick (not yet a saint) proved that even the most patient of men can lose his temper when it comes to slimy reptiles. A gang of laughing, hissing snakes that teases his aged and ailing dog, Finbar, proves the last straw for Patrick. He drives the slithering creatures off the Emerald Isle and into the sea‘save for one, the "biggest, oldest, sneakiest snake in all of Ireland." The lone creature incessantly shadows Patrick, who soon devises a plan to trap the snake and set it out to sea with the others. After much effort and a bit of derring-do, Patrick sends the snake to the depths of Loch Ness in nearby Scotland. Years later, when Patrick finally returns to check on the snake, he finds something much, much bigger. MacGill-Callahan (The Seal Prince) combines two pieces of colorful lore in a crisp and breezy text that depicts a religious figure at his most human and appealing. In Hillenbrand's (The Biggest, Best Snowman) softly hued pastel and watercolor paintings, snowy-bearded Patrick has the predominantly sweet countenance of a Santa Claus, while his beady-eyed nemesis is all forked-tongued nastiness. The rolling green countryside and vast blue waters evoke Ireland's timeless landscape. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-This frolicsome blend of folklore and legend has Patrick chasing the snakes from Ireland because "they were so naughty folks were sick and tired of having them around." One sneaky snake, however, cleverly eludes him, and from there this tale grows tall enough to stretch any imagination. When Patrick builds a beautiful snake box, the curious creature slithers into it but escapes before the lid is closed. Patrick chases the reptile through the Irish landscape, pushing the Blue Stack Mountains open to form the Long Glen of Hunting and eventually crossing the Giants' Causeway to the sea. After a passing mother eagle snatches the snake, Patrick frees him and tosses him into the box, which promptly sinks into Loch Ness. When Patrick returns years later, he is greeted by his nemesis and discovers that the creature has become the Loch Ness Monster. This delightful read-aloud is full of tongue-tickling language that will accommodate a wee bit of a dialect. Hillenbrand's mixed-media illustrations engulf the pages with humor, texture, and exuberant color. Perfect for holiday collections as well as year-round reading, this story should slither into any collection.-Jody McCoy, The Bush School, Seattle, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.