Cover image for Celia and the sweet, sweet water
Title:
Celia and the sweet, sweet water
Author:
Paterson, Katherine.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Clarion Books, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
While journeying to find a remedy for her mother's illness, Celia and her grumpy dog Brumble encounter strange and threatening characters who have never known kindness.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.7 0.5 34871.
ISBN:
9780525674818

9780395913246
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

While journeying to find a remedy for her mother's illness, Celia and her grumpy dog Brumble encounter strange and threatening characters who have never known kindness.


Summary

Long ago, a young girl named Celia lived with her mother and a grumpy dog, Brumble, in a tiny house deep in the countryside. When Celia's beloved mother fell ill, Celia tried to make her feel better, but nothing seemed to help. "If only I could drink once more the sweet, sweet water of my childhood, my life would be saved," her mother cried. As Celia loves her mother very much, she sets out immediately with the complaining Brumble to find the precious water. Along the way, they meet severalunhappy creatures: a wild child of the woods; a sobbing, wretched woman of the water; and a mad man of the mountain. Through kindness and enormous generosity, Celia manages not only to complete her quest, but to dissolve the sorrow of the three souls she has encountered on her journey.


Author Notes

Katherine Paterson was born in Qing Jiang, Jiangsu, China in 1932. She attended King College in Bristol, Tennessee and then graduate school in Virginia where she studied Bible and Christian education.

Before going to graduate school, she was a teacher for one year and after graduate school, she moved to Japan to be a missionary.

Her first book, Sign of the Chrysanthemum was published in 1991. Other titles to follow included The Bridge to Terabithia and Jacod Have I Loved which both won her a Newbery Award, The Great Gilly Hopkins, Lyddie and The Master Puppeteer.

In addition to the Newbery Award, she is the recipient of numerous others including the Scott O'Dell Award, the National Book Award for Children's Literature, the American Book Award, the American Library Association's Best Books for Young Adults Award and the New York Times Outstanding Books of the Year Award. She was also honored with the Hans Christian Anderson Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Katherine Paterson was born in Qing Jiang, Jiangsu, China in 1932. She attended King College in Bristol, Tennessee and then graduate school in Virginia where she studied Bible and Christian education.

Before going to graduate school, she was a teacher for one year and after graduate school, she moved to Japan to be a missionary.

Her first book, Sign of the Chrysanthemum was published in 1991. Other titles to follow included The Bridge to Terabithia and Jacod Have I Loved which both won her a Newbery Award, The Great Gilly Hopkins, Lyddie and The Master Puppeteer.

In addition to the Newbery Award, she is the recipient of numerous others including the Scott O'Dell Award, the National Book Award for Children's Literature, the American Book Award, the American Library Association's Best Books for Young Adults Award and the New York Times Outstanding Books of the Year Award. She was also honored with the Hans Christian Anderson Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

Ages 6^-9. With precise lyricism and a folktale cadence, an award-winning author spins a tale elegantly matched to the hyperreal, densely patterned Vagin illustrations. Celia and her mother live peacefully in a tiny house in the country, with only their large, black, and very grumpy talking dog named Brumble for company. Celia's mother does not speak of her own village and her husband, both lost in war. But when she falls ill, and longs for the "sweet, sweet water of my childhood," plucky Celia takes bread and cheese, her mother's red cloak, a wooden flute, and Brumble to fetch her some. She meets three difficult folk: a feral child, to whom she gives her lunch; a sad, old woman in a boat, who ferries them across the lake, and is given the cloak; and an angry mountain man, who is soothed by the flute, for "by the water, music sounds even lovelier than it does in a closed room." She reaches the abandoned village and has the ever-grumbling Brumble lower her into the well for the precious water, but the trials are not over yet. When Celia and Brumble return, a final difficulty will have children's hearts caught in their throats, but the message is as sweet as Celia's mother's longing. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido


Publisher's Weekly Review

Compassion is the key to this compelling fairy tale, with its heroine's quest showing glimmers of the one in Paterson's recent novel Parzival. When Celia was an infant, a "terrible war" left the girl fatherless and drove her mother from the home in which she grew up. Now Celia's mother is ill and requests "the sweet, sweet water of my childhood" to heal her. The heroine, knowing nothing of her destination, sets out to grant her mother's wish with her grumbling dog, Brumble. Several challenges stand in her path, including a "mad man of the mountain," whom she soothes with music, and a "wretched woman" of the water, whom she befriends by asking, "Why are you so wretched?" (the allusion to the Fisher King cannot be overlooked). Celia completes her mission, but Paterson gives it a surprising twist, letting readers know the girl possessed the antidote all along. Paterson cleverly employs Brumble to give voice to the passive choice that Celia ignores as she soldiers on. Vagin (who teamed up with Paterson for The King's Equal) expertly navigates the thin line between the allegorical nature of the quest and the real world, where its roots are firmly planted. His wretched woman weeps in green haze and shadow under a willow tree, as even the surrounding birches bend in sorrow; yet Celia shines, cloaked in red, as a child readers would recognize as a friend or neighbor of their own. Readers may take a leap of fancy here, but author and artist supply them with many familiar guideposts along the way. Ages 5-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-Paterson and Vagin are paired together once again (The King's Equal [HarperCollins, 1992]) for another folktale-like story. When Celia's mother falls ill, nothing will save her except the sweet water from the well in the village where she was born. Leaving their remote country home, Celia and Brumble, a grumpy, talking dog, set out to obtain the liquid. They are stopped by the "wild child of the woods," the "wretched woman of the water," and the "mad man of the mountain." Celia's kindness overcomes all of the obstacles, but her efforts are dashed when the precious bottle of water is broken just as she reaches home. It is Celia's tears that bring her mother back to life. Moral: "You cannot truly share another's happiness unless you share her tears." The detailed watercolors are well suited to the story, but an element of the page design causes a jarring effect. White text blocks are framed by a muted green, woodsy panorama while the opposite pages are brightly colored action scenes. Both depictions run off the page and into the gutter, abutting dissimilar images against one another and creating a disruption in the double spread. With familiar folktale elements, the fun of the dog's griping, and a European flair in the illustration style, the book has appeal; unfortunately, the design flaw keeps it from being completely sweet.-Julie Cummins, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Ages 6^-9. With precise lyricism and a folktale cadence, an award-winning author spins a tale elegantly matched to the hyperreal, densely patterned Vagin illustrations. Celia and her mother live peacefully in a tiny house in the country, with only their large, black, and very grumpy talking dog named Brumble for company. Celia's mother does not speak of her own village and her husband, both lost in war. But when she falls ill, and longs for the "sweet, sweet water of my childhood," plucky Celia takes bread and cheese, her mother's red cloak, a wooden flute, and Brumble to fetch her some. She meets three difficult folk: a feral child, to whom she gives her lunch; a sad, old woman in a boat, who ferries them across the lake, and is given the cloak; and an angry mountain man, who is soothed by the flute, for "by the water, music sounds even lovelier than it does in a closed room." She reaches the abandoned village and has the ever-grumbling Brumble lower her into the well for the precious water, but the trials are not over yet. When Celia and Brumble return, a final difficulty will have children's hearts caught in their throats, but the message is as sweet as Celia's mother's longing. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido


Publisher's Weekly Review

Compassion is the key to this compelling fairy tale, with its heroine's quest showing glimmers of the one in Paterson's recent novel Parzival. When Celia was an infant, a "terrible war" left the girl fatherless and drove her mother from the home in which she grew up. Now Celia's mother is ill and requests "the sweet, sweet water of my childhood" to heal her. The heroine, knowing nothing of her destination, sets out to grant her mother's wish with her grumbling dog, Brumble. Several challenges stand in her path, including a "mad man of the mountain," whom she soothes with music, and a "wretched woman" of the water, whom she befriends by asking, "Why are you so wretched?" (the allusion to the Fisher King cannot be overlooked). Celia completes her mission, but Paterson gives it a surprising twist, letting readers know the girl possessed the antidote all along. Paterson cleverly employs Brumble to give voice to the passive choice that Celia ignores as she soldiers on. Vagin (who teamed up with Paterson for The King's Equal) expertly navigates the thin line between the allegorical nature of the quest and the real world, where its roots are firmly planted. His wretched woman weeps in green haze and shadow under a willow tree, as even the surrounding birches bend in sorrow; yet Celia shines, cloaked in red, as a child readers would recognize as a friend or neighbor of their own. Readers may take a leap of fancy here, but author and artist supply them with many familiar guideposts along the way. Ages 5-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-Paterson and Vagin are paired together once again (The King's Equal [HarperCollins, 1992]) for another folktale-like story. When Celia's mother falls ill, nothing will save her except the sweet water from the well in the village where she was born. Leaving their remote country home, Celia and Brumble, a grumpy, talking dog, set out to obtain the liquid. They are stopped by the "wild child of the woods," the "wretched woman of the water," and the "mad man of the mountain." Celia's kindness overcomes all of the obstacles, but her efforts are dashed when the precious bottle of water is broken just as she reaches home. It is Celia's tears that bring her mother back to life. Moral: "You cannot truly share another's happiness unless you share her tears." The detailed watercolors are well suited to the story, but an element of the page design causes a jarring effect. White text blocks are framed by a muted green, woodsy panorama while the opposite pages are brightly colored action scenes. Both depictions run off the page and into the gutter, abutting dissimilar images against one another and creating a disruption in the double spread. With familiar folktale elements, the fun of the dog's griping, and a European flair in the illustration style, the book has appeal; unfortunately, the design flaw keeps it from being completely sweet.-Julie Cummins, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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