Cover image for Justice
Title:
Justice
Author:
Finkelstein, Caroline.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[Pittsburgh, Pa.] : Carnegie Mellon University Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
63 pages ; 22 cm
General Note:
Poems.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780887482977
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3556.I4827 J87 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

A collection of poetry by Caroline Finkelstein.


Author Notes

CAROLINE FINKELSTEIN's two previous collections of poems are Windows Facing East and Germany. She has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Massachusetts Artist's Fellowship Program, the Vermont Council on the Arts, and the Arvon Foundation. During 1998, she spent a year in Florence, Italy, as an Amy Lowell Traveling Scholar.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

The justice sought in Finkelstein's third book is an intimate matter: two persons once colluded joyfully "to become the absolute same body" even while "the idea of separate selves/ appeared singularly beautiful" ("Confused Figure"). Now the poet tries the questions between them in pleadings fashioned from rich puns and radiant images. "Deposition" testifies to the "divided thinking" that both plagues and exhilarates many of the poems in this short, brilliant collection. Evidence accumulates in one "Brief" and another‘and in "An Opinion," "Inquiry," "Argument," "The Penalty" and "Her Testimony." "Statement" finishes on a verdict: "I flung you hard/ from my outstretched hand." The poems of judgment are balanced by poems of assessment ("The Collusion," "A Persuasion," "Perspective" and more) that stop in mid-inquiry with an em-dash. Outside the poet's courtroom, other figures appear: Mary Cassatt ("Portrait and Prints"), the poet's parents ("At the Equinox," "Fabric"), a dying friend ("Landscape," "Early Winter"), the Chinese empress whose "countrymen credit her/with the invention of the loom and reeling silk" ("Fabric"). Unlike Finkelstein's second collection, Germany, in which judgment was unequivocal, memory was horror, and images multiplied to refine an appalling impression, Justice entertains ambivalence. If a reader may leave the sentimental abstractions of a few poems (the first "Brief," "The Difference") disappointed, most of Justice offers lasting rewards. Its elegance and its rage finally explode into a party where guests talk "rare-specimen-of-horticulture-talk and sparrow-gabble" ("My Little Esperanto"). "Sweetheart," the poet has us collude with her in concluding, "the silence will be awful when we die and leave." (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Table of Contents

At the Equinox
Fabric
I Wanted to Forget
Is That the Wind Rattling a Tin Plate Again?
Sympathy
Portrait and Prints
Landscape
Early Winter
"Briefly It Enters and Briefly Speaks"
Four Friends
Deposition
Brief
The Collusion
Vineyard
New Address
To Heaven
An Opinion
A Persuasion
Inquiry
Argument
The Penalty
Perspective
Interpretation
Her Testimony
Confused Figure
Garden in the Field
The Dove
The Difference
Counterpoint
Brief
Statement
Too Young
The Wedding
Only a Story
Purely Drinking My Coffee
The Small Killers
I Have His Look
Against Closing
My Little Esperanto
Note

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