Cover image for Bumblebee, bumblebee, do you know me? : a garden guessing game
Title:
Bumblebee, bumblebee, do you know me? : a garden guessing game
Author:
Rockwell, Anne F.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollins, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 21 x 26 cm
Summary:
A series of riddles that first give descriptions of various flowers and then reveal their names.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780060273309

9780060282127

9780060273316
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Angola Public Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Little Books
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Clearfield Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Collins Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Elma Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Kenilworth Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Kenmore Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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North Collins Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Ladybug, ladybug do you know me? My thorns are prickly, but my blossoms are soft. I am a rose. This is a garden of a book--filled with the scents, textures, colors, and shapes of the first flowers young children notice. Featuring a striking design that pairs a vivid silk-screen illustration of a flower with a simple riddle.

00 Kansas Bill Martin, Jr. Picture Book Award Masterlist


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3-6. This picture book presents a series of short, riddle-and-response conversations between various blooming plants and the critters living around them. Each double-page spread displays a flower and a few lines of text, such as "Butterfly, butterfly, / do you know me? / Here I stand, tall and straight, / while my silky cup catches rain." Facing the text page with its picture of a butterfly is a large painting of a single flower; the words "I am a tulip" following the shape of its leaves. The illustrations, silkscreen designs painted with watercolor and gouache, capture the significant features of various plants with a minimum of fuss. Along with the well-chosen words, the pictures will help children learn the names of common posies as they play the simple riddle game. A nicely designed and downright pretty picture book for those who "could while away the hours, conversin' with the flowers." (Reviewed March 15, 1999)0060273305Carolyn Phelan


Publisher's Weekly Review

Just in time to herald spring's flowers, Rockwell (Once Upon a Time This Morning) has created a graceful primer on the inhabitants of the backyard garden. Each spread poses an evocative flower riddle to a different insect: "Bumblebee, bumblebee, do you know me? Yellow and green, I wave to the breeze to say that spring is here." The answer, "I am a daffodil," is found on the opposite page in lighter typeface, set in a line following the curve of the flower's leaf. Nine other flowers follow; for the grand finale, the riddle is addressed to a "little boy," and the subject, a sunflower, stands tall across the spread when the book is held sideways. Using silk screens painted with watercolor and gouache, Rockwell creates elegant stylized shapes that efficiently and memorably communicate each flower's architecture to young eyes; at the same time, she's able to convey the softness of a petal and the radiant layers of color that exist in a single blossom. She underscores the simple beauty of her paintings with a stunning book design that plays down its own sophistication: ornamental capitals subtly accentuate the flower and insect compositions; the white ground is in perfect balance with the fields of gorgeously chosen color. The look is as fresh as a daisy. Ages 3-7. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1‘A disappointing effort. On each double-page spread, a riddle about a flower is addressed to an insect: "Butterfly, butterfly,/do you know me?/Here I stand, tall and straight,/while my silky cup catches rain." The left-hand page shows the insect set against a background color that coordinates with the flower, which appears on the right with its name tucked into the drawing. The illustrations, done with watercolors and gouache on silk screen, are uneven. A few of the images are eye-catching‘the iris has some stunning purple tones and the rose some lively shades of pink and red. The majority of the flowers, however, look washed-out and dull. While words are simple, most of the clues are not. Children may not be familiar with the names and appearances of some of these blooms, such as zinnias and morning glories. Lois Ehlert's Planting a Rainbow (Harcourt, 1988) is a more appealing and colorful introduction to flowers.‘Dina Sherman, Brooklyn Children's Museum, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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