Cover image for The scramble for art in Central Africa
Title:
The scramble for art in Central Africa
Author:
Schildkrout, Enid.
Publication Information:
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
xiii, 257 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Objects and agendas : re-collecting the Congo / "Enlightened but in darkness" : interpretations of Kuba art and culture at the turn of the twentieth century / Kuba art and the birth of ethnography / Curios and curiosity : notes on reading Torday and Frobenius / Appendix : on the ethnography and economics of collecting, from Leo Frobenius' Nochmals zu den Bakubavölkern / Artes Africanae : the western discovery of "art" in northeastern Congo / Nineteenth-century images of the Mangbetu in explorers' accounts / Personal styles and disciplinary paradigms : Frederick Starr and Herbert Lang / Where art and ethnology met : the Ward African collection at the Smithsonian / "Magic, or as we usually say, art" : a framework for comparing European and African art
ISBN:
9780521583497

9780521586788
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N7399.C6 S39 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Western attitudes to Africa have been influenced to an extraordinary degree by the arts and artefacts that were brought back by the early collectors, exhibited in museums, and celebrated by scholars and artists in the metropolitan centres. The contributors to this volume trace the life history of artefacts that were brought to Europe and America from Congo towards the end of the nineteenth century, and became the subjects of museum displays. They also present fascinating case studies of the pioneering collectors, including such major figures as Frobenius and Torday. They discuss the complex and sensitive issues involved in the business of 'collecting', and show how the collections and exhibitions influenced academic debates about the categories of art and artefact, and the notion of authenticity, and challenged conventional aesthetic values, as modern Western artists began to draw on African models.


Table of Contents

List of figures
List of contributors
Acknowledgments
1 Objects and agendas: re-collecting the Congo Enid Schildkrout and CurtisA. Keim
2 'Enlightened but in darkness': interpretations of Kuba art and culture at the turn of the twentieth centuryDavid A. Binkley and Patricia J. Darish
3 Kuba art and the birth of ethnographyJohn Mack
4 Curios and curiosity: notes on reading Torday and Frobenius Johannes Fabian; Appendix: on the ethnography and economics of collecting, from Leo Frobenius'Nochmals zu den Bakubavolkern Johannes Fabian
5 Artes Africanae: the western discovery of 'art' in northeastern CongoCurtis A. Keim
6 Nineteenth-century images of the Mangbetu in explorers' accountsChristaud M. Geary
7 Personal styles and disciplinary paradigmsFrederick Starr and Herbert Lang Enid Schildkrout
8 Where art and ethnology met: the Ward African collection at theSmithsonian Mary Jo Arnoldi
9 'Magic, or as we usually say, art': a framework for comparing European and African artWyatt MacGaffey
References
Index

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