Cover image for Minimalism
Title:
Minimalism
Author:
Batchelor, David, 1955-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
80 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
General Note:
Originally published: London : Tate Gallery, 1997.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780521627597
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N6494.M5 B28 1997 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Many people have difficulty appreciating Carl Andre's 'Equivalent VIII,' consisting of 120 bricks, as a work of art. This publication shows not only how the bricks are indeed sculpture, but that Minimalist works such as this present some of the most intersting and imaginative work of the 1960s. Minimalism emerged and developed as a reaction against the emotiveness of Abstract Expressionism. Although most of the artists involved did not regard themselves as part of a group, there are certain key factors that define Minimalist work: it is abstract, three-dimensional, modular, serial, geometric, preconceived in design and industrial in execution. This introduction examines the implications of these characteristics, looking in particular at the work of five key artists: Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, and Robert Morris.


Table of Contents

Introduction
1 After Abstract Expressionism
2 Andre, Flavin, Judd, LeWitt
3 Critical interpretations
4 Revisions and continuations

Google Preview