Cover image for Mark Twain at the Buffalo express : articles and sketches by America's favorite humorist
Title:
Mark Twain at the Buffalo express : articles and sketches by America's favorite humorist
Author:
Twain, Mark, 1835-1910.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
DeKalb : Northern Illinois University Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xlvii, 309 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Added Uniform Title:
Buffalo express.
ISBN:
9780875802497

9780875805856
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Rare Books-Appointment Needed
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Central Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Buffalo Collection Non-Circ
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Central Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Buffalo Closed Stacks
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Central Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Rare Books Reference
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Clearfield Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Crane Branch Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Local History
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East Aurora Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Orchard Park Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library PS1303 .M325 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Work Room
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Collected here for the first time are stories, articles, and commentaries Twain wrote during eighteen months as editor of the Buffalo Express. These entertaining writings contain some of his finest humor and social criticism, as well as themes and characters later included in his most beloved works.


Summary

In August 1869 Mark Twain acquired part ownership of the Buffalo Express . During the following eighteen months, he wrote some of his best short pieces, humorous sketches, rants, and commentaries. Mark Twain at the "Buffalo Express" collects these complete and unabridged writings for the first time.

Twain's writings for the Buffalo Express crackle with his trademark energy, wit, and insight, illuminating his literary and intellectual journey during a seldom-studied period in his life. From these articles Twain cultivated themes and characters that later appeared in his best-known works. Everyone who loves Mark Twain will love Mark Twain at the "Buffalo Express."


Author Notes

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled throughout the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, Gilded Age in 1873, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled throughout the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, Gilded Age in 1873, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Choice Review

All academic libraries with upper-division classes should own this volume as a matter of course, adding to their collections invaluable short Twain pieces including editorials, squibs, burlesques, hoaxes, and satires written in 1869 and 1870. The volume also includes many well-known Twain pieces, along with less-known obscurities. Of special interest are Twain's commentaries on the subjects of scandal, sensationalism, and the role of the media in public perceptions. McCullough's helpful introduction will assist readers interested in 19th-century humor and US humor in general and in comparisons of the US character then and now. On its own, the volume is entertaining and illuminating; in the context of other Twain works, it is a welcome and overdue addition to the Twain canon, offering most of the important material from a transitional period of Twain 's life. Suitable for both undergraduates and specialists. W. Britton; Harrisburg Area Community College


Choice Review

All academic libraries with upper-division classes should own this volume as a matter of course, adding to their collections invaluable short Twain pieces including editorials, squibs, burlesques, hoaxes, and satires written in 1869 and 1870. The volume also includes many well-known Twain pieces, along with less-known obscurities. Of special interest are Twain's commentaries on the subjects of scandal, sensationalism, and the role of the media in public perceptions. McCullough's helpful introduction will assist readers interested in 19th-century humor and US humor in general and in comparisons of the US character then and now. On its own, the volume is entertaining and illuminating; in the context of other Twain works, it is a welcome and overdue addition to the Twain canon, offering most of the important material from a transitional period of Twain 's life. Suitable for both undergraduates and specialists. W. Britton; Harrisburg Area Community College


Excerpts

Excerpts

"I am not going to introduce any startling reforms, or in any way attempt to make trouble. I am simply going to do my plain, unpretending duty, when I cannot get out of it.... I shall always confine myself strictly to the truth, except when it is attended with inconvenience."--from Mark Twain's "Salutatory," Buffalo Express , August 21, 1869 Excerpted from Mark Twain at the Buffalo Express: Articles and Sketches by America's Favorite Humorist by Mark Twain All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.
"I am not going to introduce any startling reforms, or in any way attempt to make trouble. I am simply going to do my plain, unpretending duty, when I cannot get out of it.... I shall always confine myself strictly to the truth, except when it is attended with inconvenience."--from Mark Twain's "Salutatory," Buffalo Express , August 21, 1869 Excerpted from Mark Twain at the Buffalo Express: Articles and Sketches by America's Favorite Humorist by Mark Twain All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Prefacep. ix
Note to the Textp. xi
Introductionp. xiii
Part I Settling in to Editorial Duties August 1869-October 1869
"Salutatory"p. 5
Removal of the Capitalp. 7
Lady Byron--Mrs. Stowe's Revelationsp. 8
Inspired Humorp. 9
The "Monopoly" Speaksp. 11
A Day at Niagarap. 12
Uncriminal Victimsp. 18
The Byron Scandalp. 19
[A Fine Old Man]p. 21
Only a Niggerp. 22
English Festivitiesp. 23
The Prodigal Son Returnsp. 28
The Byron Scandalp. 29
The Byron Questionp. 30
Journalism in Tennesseep. 31
More Byron Scandalp. 37
Butler on the Byron Scandalp. 38
The Last Words of Great Menp. 44
Personalp. 47
"Mr. and Mrs. Byron"p. 47
The Gates Ajarp. 51
The "Wild Man"p. 53
Rev. H. W. Beecherp. 56
The Ticket--Explanationp. 59
Engineer Griffinp. 60
The Latest Noveltyp. 62
Part II Lighting Out for the Lecture Circuit October 1869-January 1870
Around the World: Letter No. 1p. 67
Mark Twain: His Greetings to the California Pioneersp. 71
The Legend of the Capitoline Venusp. 73
Around the World: Letter No. 2p. 78
The Paraguay Puzzlep. 84
A Good Letterp. 86
Hanging to Slow Musicp. 88
Around the World: Letter No. 3p. 89
Civilized Brutalityp. 93
Browsing Aroundp. 95
The Richardson Murderp. 101
Browsing Aroundp. 102
The Law of Divorcep. 107
Around the World: Letter No. 4p. 108
Around the World: Letter No. 5p. 112
Ye Cuban Patriotp. 117
An Indignant Rebukep. 120
The Hyenasp. 121
An Awful--Terrible Medieval Romancep. 123
Mrs. Stowe's Vindicationp. 129
Around the World: Letter No. 6p. 130
A Ghost Storyp. 134
Around the World: Letter No. 7p. 140
Around the World: Letter No. 8p. 144
Part III Back to Buffalo February 1870-May 1870
Nasby's Lecturep. 153
Anson Burlingamep. 153
The Blondesp. 157
Personalp. 159
More Wisdomp. 159
"A Big Thing"p. 161
A Mysterious Visitp. 166
Literary Guide to Williams and Packard's System of Penmanshipp. 170
The Facts in the Great Land Slide Casep. 172
Mark Twain on Agriculturep. 176
The New Crimep. 177
The Story of the Good Little Boy Who Did Not Prosperp. 182
Curious Dreamp. 186
Curious Dream, Conclusionp. 191
Murder and Insanityp. 194
Part IV Personal Troubles and Rumors of War May 1870-October 1870
Personalp. 199
Our Precious Lunaticp. 204
Street Sprinklingp. 207
More Distinctionp. 208
How Higgins Gently Broke the Newsp. 210
Buffalo Female Academyp. 211
The Editorial Office Borep. 215
How I Edited an Agricultural Paperp. 217
The European War!!!p. 222
Obituaryp. 224
To the Readerp. 227
At the President's Receptionp. 229
Curious Relic for Salep. 233
Mark Twain: His Map and Fortifications of Parisp. 238
Part V The Last Days of Journalism October 1870-January 1871
On Riley--Newspaper Correspondentp. 243
The Libel Suitp. 246
A Reminiscence of the Back Settlementsp. 248
A General Replyp. 250
Running for Governorp. 254
My Watch--An Instructive Little Talep. 259
An Entertaining Articlep. 262
Dogberry in Washingtonp. 266
War and "Wittles"p. 268
The Facts in the Case of George Fisher, Deceasedp. 270
"Waiting for the Verdict"p. 276
A Sad, Sad Businessp. 277
Mean Peoplep. 280
The Danger of Lying in Bedp. 281
Notesp. 285
Indexp. 307
Prefacep. ix
Note to the Textp. xi
Introductionp. xiii
Part I Settling in to Editorial Duties August 1869-October 1869
"Salutatory"p. 5
Removal of the Capitalp. 7
Lady Byron--Mrs. Stowe's Revelationsp. 8
Inspired Humorp. 9
The "Monopoly" Speaksp. 11
A Day at Niagarap. 12
Uncriminal Victimsp. 18
The Byron Scandalp. 19
[A Fine Old Man]p. 21
Only a Niggerp. 22
English Festivitiesp. 23
The Prodigal Son Returnsp. 28
The Byron Scandalp. 29
The Byron Questionp. 30
Journalism in Tennesseep. 31
More Byron Scandalp. 37
Butler on the Byron Scandalp. 38
The Last Words of Great Menp. 44
Personalp. 47
"Mr. and Mrs. Byron"p. 47
The Gates Ajarp. 51
The "Wild Man"p. 53
Rev. H. W. Beecherp. 56
The Ticket--Explanationp. 59
Engineer Griffinp. 60
The Latest Noveltyp. 62
Part II Lighting Out for the Lecture Circuit October 1869-January 1870
Around the World: Letter No. 1p. 67
Mark Twain: His Greetings to the California Pioneersp. 71
The Legend of the Capitoline Venusp. 73
Around the World: Letter No. 2p. 78
The Paraguay Puzzlep. 84
A Good Letterp. 86
Hanging to Slow Musicp. 88
Around the World: Letter No. 3p. 89
Civilized Brutalityp. 93
Browsing Aroundp. 95
The Richardson Murderp. 101
Browsing Aroundp. 102
The Law of Divorcep. 107
Around the World: Letter No. 4p. 108
Around the World: Letter No. 5p. 112
Ye Cuban Patriotp. 117
An Indignant Rebukep. 120
The Hyenasp. 121
An Awful--Terrible Medieval Romancep. 123
Mrs. Stowe's Vindicationp. 129
Around the World: Letter No. 6p. 130
A Ghost Storyp. 134
Around the World: Letter No. 7p. 140
Around the World: Letter No. 8p. 144
Part III Back to Buffalo February 1870-May 1870
Nasby's Lecturep. 153
Anson Burlingamep. 153
The Blondesp. 157
Personalp. 159
More Wisdomp. 159
"A Big Thing"p. 161
A Mysterious Visitp. 166
Literary Guide to Williams and Packard's System of Penmanshipp. 170
The Facts in the Great Land Slide Casep. 172
Mark Twain on Agriculturep. 176
The New Crimep. 177
The Story of the Good Little Boy Who Did Not Prosperp. 182
Curious Dreamp. 186
Curious Dream, Conclusionp. 191
Murder and Insanityp. 194
Part IV Personal Troubles and Rumors of War May 1870-October 1870
Personalp. 199
Our Precious Lunaticp. 204
Street Sprinklingp. 207
More Distinctionp. 208
How Higgins Gently Broke the Newsp. 210
Buffalo Female Academyp. 211
The Editorial Office Borep. 215
How I Edited an Agricultural Paperp. 217
The European War!!!p. 222
Obituaryp. 224
To the Readerp. 227
At the President's Receptionp. 229
Curious Relic for Salep. 233
Mark Twain: His Map and Fortifications of Parisp. 238
Part V The Last Days of Journalism October 1870-January 1871
On Riley--Newspaper Correspondentp. 243
The Libel Suitp. 246
A Reminiscence of the Back Settlementsp. 248
A General Replyp. 250
Running for Governorp. 254
My Watch--An Instructive Little Talep. 259
An Entertaining Articlep. 262
Dogberry in Washingtonp. 266
War and "Wittles"p. 268
The Facts in the Case of George Fisher, Deceasedp. 270
"Waiting for the Verdict"p. 276
A Sad, Sad Businessp. 277
Mean Peoplep. 280
The Danger of Lying in Bedp. 281
Notesp. 285
Indexp. 307

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