Cover image for The journal of Joshua Loper : a Black cowboy
Title:
The journal of Joshua Loper : a Black cowboy
Author:
Myers, Walter Dean, 1937-2014.
Publication Information:
New York : Scholastic, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
158 pages ; 20 cm.
Summary:
In 1871 Joshua Loper, a sixteen-year-old black cowboy, records in his journal his experiences while making his first cattle drive under an unsympathetic trail boss.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1000 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.0 4.0 31189.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.9 8 Quiz: 16128 Guided reading level: W.
ISBN:
9780590026918
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Boston Free Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Clearfield Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
East Delavan Branch Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Eggertsville-Snyder Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Grand Island Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Frank E. Merriweather Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Orchard Park Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Williamsville Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Julia Boyer Reinstein Library X Juvenile Fiction On Display
Searching...
Audubon Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...
Audubon Library X Juvenile Fiction Series
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Two-time Newbery Honor-winning author Myers writes about an African-American boy's struggles with his first cattle drive in 1871 and the racial prejudices of the day. Map.


Author Notes

Walter Dean Myers was born on August 12, 1937 in Martinsberg, West Virginia. When he was three years old, his mother died and his father sent him to live with Herbert and Florence Dean in Harlem, New York. He began writing stories while in his teens. He dropped out of high school and enlisted in the Army at the age of 17. After completing his army service, he took a construction job and continued to write.

He entered and won a 1969 contest sponsored by the Council on Interracial Books for Children, which led to the publication of his first book, Where Does the Day Go? During his lifetime, he wrote more than 100 fiction and nonfiction books for children and young adults. His works include Fallen Angels, Bad Boy, Darius and Twig, Scorpions, Lockdown, Sunrise Over Fallujah, Invasion, Juba!, and On a Clear Day. He also collaborated with his son Christopher, an artist, on a number of picture books for young readers including We Are America: A Tribute from the Heart and Harlem, which received a Caldecott Honor Award, as well as the teen novel Autobiography of My Dead Brother.

He was the winner of the first-ever Michael L. Printz Award for Monster, the first recipient of the Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement, and a recipient of the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults. He also won the Coretta Scott King Award for African American authors five times. He died on July 1, 2014, following a brief illness, at the age of 76.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-6. For this entry in My Name Is America, a companion series to the popular Dear America books, Myers sends a young African American cowboy north on the Chisholm Trail in 1871. It's a dream come true for Joshua when he's hired to help drive 2,200 "beeves" from a Texas ranch to Abilene, Kansas; by the time the journey's over, he not only has faced up to rustlers, stampedes, and Indians but also has met buffalo soldiers and Wild Bill Hickock, all while earning the grudging respect of his hard-bitten, prejudiced trail boss. Although written in dated daily episodes, Joshua's narrative is too smooth for a credible diary; he does have a voice of his own, though, and imparts a clear, reasonably specific picture of a cowboy's work and how hard, dirty, and exhausting it was: "May 25. I sat down to write two days in a row, and just fell asleep." Two historical notes (one fictional) and a generous suite of contemporary pictures add verisimilitude--or, along with the absence of Myers' name on the cover, misdirection for unwary readers--to this informative, expert peek behind the cowboy mythos. (Reviewed February 15, 1999)0590026917John Peters


Google Preview