Cover image for Of many colors : portraits of multiracial families
Title:
Of many colors : portraits of multiracial families
Author:
Kaeser, Gigi.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Amherst : University of Massachusetts Press, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
xiv, 143 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781558491007

9781558491014
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HQ1031 .K33 1997 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Based on an award-winning photo exhibit, this book documents the feelings and experiences of Americans who live in multiracial families. It tells the stories of 39 families who have bridged the racial divide through interracial marriage or adoption. Parents and children speak candidly about their lives, their relationships and the ways in which they have dealt with issues of race.


Summary

Based on an award-winning photo exhibit, this book documents the feelings and experiences of Americans who live in multiracial families. Of Many Colors tells the stories of thirty-nine families who have bridged the racial divide through interracial marriage or adoption. In these pages, parents and children speak candidly about their lives, their relationships, and the ways in which they have dealt with issues of race.

Although the number of mixed-race families in America is steadily rising, this trend remains controversial. For centuries, America has depended on distinct racial categories for its social, political, and economic organization. The current debate over the inclusion of a "multiracial" category on census forms illustrates the extent to which the deeply embedded construct of race continues to divide our society.

Transracial adoption has also generated fierce controversy and debate. As in the case of racial categories, the discussion of transracial adoption reflects ever-changing social standards. As recently as 1987, thirty-five states had laws prohibiting the adoption of black children by white families. In 1996, however, President Clinton signed a bill making it illegal to prohibit adoptions based on race.

The interviews in this book provide the reader with a clear understanding of how mixed-race families contradict stereotypes, challenge racism, and demonstrate that people of different races can indeed live together in harmony. Family members also have much to say about the most intimate form of integration, familial love, and this love is made visible in the superb photographs by Gigi Kaeser.


Author Notes

Gigi Kaeser and Peggy Gillespie are codirectors of Family Diversity Projects, Inc. in Amherst, Massachusetts. Kaeser's photographs have been featured in many publications, including the Boston Globe Sunday Magazine. A freelance journalist, Gillespie is author with choreographer Bill T. Jones of Last Night on Earth. Glenda Valentine is the training coordinator for the Teaching Tolerance Project of the Southern Poverty Law Center.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

One of the visible effects of our increasingly diverse society is multiracial children. The New York Times has estimated that the number of those children has jumped by 300 percent since the 1970 census. In this compendium, the catalog of an award-winning exhibition that has been traveling since 1993, photographer Gigi Kaeser and interviewer Peggy Gillespie profile 39 families with multiracial children. (Kaeser and Gillespie are codirectors of Family Diversity Projects, Inc, in Amherst, Massachusetts.) By using photographs and interviews with both parents and children, the authors show us the joys and frustrations inherent in being multiracial in a country that officially recognizes only five racial categories. This book will be useful to parents who want to show the variety of family life to their children, to teachers exploring issues of race and identity, and to readers trying to understand the current proposal to add a multiracial category to the decennial census for the year 2000. Recommended for all public libraries.‘Nora Harris, Corte Madera Regional Branch Lib., Cal. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

One of the visible effects of our increasingly diverse society is multiracial children. The New York Times has estimated that the number of those children has jumped by 300 percent since the 1970 census. In this compendium, the catalog of an award-winning exhibition that has been traveling since 1993, photographer Gigi Kaeser and interviewer Peggy Gillespie profile 39 families with multiracial children. (Kaeser and Gillespie are codirectors of Family Diversity Projects, Inc, in Amherst, Massachusetts.) By using photographs and interviews with both parents and children, the authors show us the joys and frustrations inherent in being multiracial in a country that officially recognizes only five racial categories. This book will be useful to parents who want to show the variety of family life to their children, to teachers exploring issues of race and identity, and to readers trying to understand the current proposal to add a multiracial category to the decennial census for the year 2000. Recommended for all public libraries.‘Nora Harris, Corte Madera Regional Branch Lib., Cal. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview