Cover image for Postmodernism, or, The cultural logic of late capitalism
Title:
Postmodernism, or, The cultural logic of late capitalism
Author:
Jameson, Fredric.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Durham : Duke University Press, 1999.

©1991
Physical Description:
xxii, 438 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1710 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780822309291

9780822310907
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN98.P67 J3 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Now in paperback, Fredric Jameson's most wide-ranging work seeks to crystalize a definition of "postmodernism." Jameson's inquiry looks at the postmodern across a wide landscape, from "high" art to "low," from market ideology to architecture, from painting to "punk" film, from video art to literature.


Summary

Now in paperback, Fredric Jameson's most wide-ranging work seeks to crystalize a definition of "postmodernism". Jameson's inquiry looks at the postmodern across a wide landscape, from "high" art to "low" from market ideology to architecture, from painting to "punk" film, from video art to literature.
 


Author Notes

Fredric R. Jameson, Marxist theorist and professor of comparative literature at Duke University, was born in Cleveland in 1934. He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard University and taught at Harvard, the University of California at San Diego, and Yale University before moving to Duke in 1985. He most famous work is Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism, which won the Modern Language Association's Lowell Award.

Jameson was among the first to associate a specific set of political and economic circumstances with the term postmodernism. His other books include Sartre: The Origin of a Style, The Seeds of Time, and The Cultural Turn.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Fredric R. Jameson, Marxist theorist and professor of comparative literature at Duke University, was born in Cleveland in 1934. He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard University and taught at Harvard, the University of California at San Diego, and Yale University before moving to Duke in 1985. He most famous work is Postmodernism, or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism, which won the Modern Language Association's Lowell Award.

Jameson was among the first to associate a specific set of political and economic circumstances with the term postmodernism. His other books include Sartre: The Origin of a Style, The Seeds of Time, and The Cultural Turn.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Jameson argues that the cultural logic of our social forms has changed in this late capitalist period because of a transformation in the material base of capitalism itself. This argument provides the occasion for a series of efforts at "a formal reading of the thing itself," and the "thing itself" is to be found in a diverse range of objects and contexts, from the disorienting groundplan of the Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles to the finely wrought French syntax of Claude Simon's recent novels. This book will surprise many readers by its easy mastery of the vocabularies of so many expert cultures--architecture, philosophy, literary theory, political economy, film theory among them. More surprising is Jameson's account of the essentially "allegorical" character of postmodernism, which must be "transcoded" like an allegorical social text so that patterns of social and economic forces may be deduced. At the center of Jameson's transcoding of the complex field of the aesthetic ideology (which tries to register sensory experiences) lies the enigmatic utopian kernel of "nonalienated labor," where market forces and cultural experience would once again fall into harmony. What Jameson calls "postmodernism" is really a means of securing moments of resistent thinking within the turbulent, protean field of ideology. The task is ultimately to win back the aesthetic ideology's power to impact significantly on social and market forces. Jameson practices a kind of allegorical materialism that puts aesthetic forms into historical motion. This is a classic of late 20th-century Euroamerican critical thought. -N. Lukacher, University of Illinois at Chicago


Choice Review

Jameson argues that the cultural logic of our social forms has changed in this late capitalist period because of a transformation in the material base of capitalism itself. This argument provides the occasion for a series of efforts at "a formal reading of the thing itself," and the "thing itself" is to be found in a diverse range of objects and contexts, from the disorienting groundplan of the Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles to the finely wrought French syntax of Claude Simon's recent novels. This book will surprise many readers by its easy mastery of the vocabularies of so many expert cultures--architecture, philosophy, literary theory, political economy, film theory among them. More surprising is Jameson's account of the essentially "allegorical" character of postmodernism, which must be "transcoded" like an allegorical social text so that patterns of social and economic forces may be deduced. At the center of Jameson's transcoding of the complex field of the aesthetic ideology (which tries to register sensory experiences) lies the enigmatic utopian kernel of "nonalienated labor," where market forces and cultural experience would once again fall into harmony. What Jameson calls "postmodernism" is really a means of securing moments of resistent thinking within the turbulent, protean field of ideology. The task is ultimately to win back the aesthetic ideology's power to impact significantly on social and market forces. Jameson practices a kind of allegorical materialism that puts aesthetic forms into historical motion. This is a classic of late 20th-century Euroamerican critical thought. -N. Lukacher, University of Illinois at Chicago


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