Cover image for Mass politics : the politics of popular culture
Title:
Mass politics : the politics of popular culture
Author:
Shea, Daniel M.
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's : Worth, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xii, 161 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction : Popular culture-- the Trojan horse of American politics? / Daniel M. Shea -- Murphy Brown and postfeminist politics / Bonnie J. Dow -- The stronger women get, the more men love football / Mariah Burton Nelson -- Girls 'n' spice : all things nice? / Susan J. Douglas -- Race and college sports : a long way to go / Richard E. Lapchick -- Logo or libel? Chief Wahoo, multiculturalism, and the politics of sports mascots / Neil A. Engelhart -- Number one with a bullet : songs of violence are part of America's folk tradition / David Hershey-Webb -- Aunt Jemima, the Frito Bandito, and Crazy Horse : selling stereotypes American style / Marilyn Kern-Foxworth -- Affluent class and corporate brass in the make-believe media / Michael Parenti -- There he is, Miss America : Howard Stern's deconstruction of media images / Nick Gillespie -- Popular populism : political messages in country music lyrics / Jimmie N. Rogers and Stephen A. Smith -- The collapse of popular culture and the case for censorship / Robert H. Bork -- A filmmaker's credo : some thoughts on politics, history, and the movies / Oliver Stone -- TV vice? Sex and violence aren't the problem / Michael Medved -- The shelter of each other : one big town / Mary Pipher.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780312219499

9780312171018
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HM101 .M2689 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

This provocative collection of essays explores the interplay between pop culture and politics, using pop culture as a lens through which to view political life in the United States. Ranging from discussions of Murphy Brown to rap music to censorship, the essays encourage critical thinking about the ways in which popular culture shapes, reflects, and responds to the political climate.


Summary

This provocative collection of essays explores the interplay between pop culture and politics, using pop culture as a lens through which to view political life in the United States. Perfect for courses in American Government or Media and Politics, this flexible supplement encourages critical thinking about the ways in which popular culture shapes, reflects, and responds to the political climate.


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Where interest in critical analyses of pop culture is strong, these studies should attract readers. Budd and his coauthors are media scholars. They examine TV's political economy; use textual analysis to probe its effects, visible and invisible; draw on audience studies to discern differences in response "along lines of wealth, ethnicity, and gender"; consider the limited ways commercial TV tries to address the needs of an increasingly fragmented audience; and assess the impact of TV's individualized virtual reality on participation in personal relationships and involvement with the environment. By encouraging unreasoning consumption, they maintain, TV accelerates the destruction of the natural environment. But the authors are not Luddites; their final chapter, "From Consumers to Activists," offers viewers suggestions on dealing with the tube. Mass Politics is a collection of essays on topics at the intersection of politics and pop culture. Part 1, on gender politics, covers both Murphy Brown and the Spice Girls and includes Mariah Burton Nelson's notable "The Stronger Women Get, the More Men Love Football." In part 2, on race and sports, topics include college sports, team mascots, violent songs, and racially weighted corporate symbols. In part 3, "Entertainment and the Politics of Class," Michael Parenti discusses affluence in its many guises and the media; other authors take on Howard Stern and country music. Part 4, "Decline of Civil Society," contains the work of an odd foursome: Robert Bork, Oliver Stone, Michael Medved, and Mary Pipher. --Mary Carroll


Table of Contents

Daniel M. SheaBonnie J. DowMariah Burton NelsonSusan J. DouglasRichard E. LapchickNeil A. EngelhartDavid Hershey-WebbMarilyn Kern-FoxworthMichael ParentiNick GillespieJimmie N. Rogers and Stephen A. SmithRobert H. BorkOliver StoneMichael MedvedMary PipherDaniel M. SheaBonnie J. DowMariah Burton NelsonSusan J. DouglasRichard E. LapchickNeil A. EngelhartDavid Hershey-WebbMarilyn Kern-FoxworthMichael ParentiNick GillespieJimmie N. Rogers and Stephen A. SmithRobert H. BorkOliver StoneMichael MedvedMary Pipher
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Popular Culture--The Trojan Horse of American Politics?p. 1
Part I Gender Politics in Popular Culture
1 Murphy Brown and Postfeminist Politicsp. 15
2 The Stronger Women Get, the More Men Love Footballp. 32
3 Girls 'n' Spiece: All Things Nice?p. 45
Part II Race Relations and the Politics of Fun and Games
4 Race and College Sports: A Long Way to Gop. 50
5 Logo or Libel? Chief Wahoo, Multiculturalism, and the Politics of Sports Mascotsp. 63
6 Number One with a Bullet: Songs of Violence Are Part of America's Folk Traditionp. 75
7 Aunt Jemima, the Frito Bandito, and Crazy Horse: Selling Stereotypes American Stylep. 81
Part III Entertainment and the Politics of Class
8 Affluent Class and Corporate Brass in the Make-Believe Mediap. 91
9 There He Is, Miss America: Howard Stern's Deconstruction of Media Imagesp. 104
10 Popular Populism: Political Messages in Country Music Lyricsp. 111
Part IV Popular Culture and the Decline of Civil Society
11 The Collapse of Popular Culture and the Case for Censorshipp. 122
12 A Filmmaker's Credo: Some Thoughts on Politics, History, and the Moviesp. 135
13 TV Vice? Sex and Violence Aren't the Problemp. 142
14 The Shelter of Each Other: One Big Townp. 148
Prefacep. ix
Introduction: Popular Culture--The Trojan Horse of American Politics?p. 1
Part I Gender Politics in Popular Culture
1 Murphy Brown and Postfeminist Politicsp. 15
2 The Stronger Women Get, the More Men Love Footballp. 32
3 Girls 'n' Spiece: All Things Nice?p. 45
Part II Race Relations and the Politics of Fun and Games
4 Race and College Sports: A Long Way to Gop. 50
5 Logo or Libel? Chief Wahoo, Multiculturalism, and the Politics of Sports Mascotsp. 63
6 Number One with a Bullet: Songs of Violence Are Part of America's Folk Traditionp. 75
7 Aunt Jemima, the Frito Bandito, and Crazy Horse: Selling Stereotypes American Stylep. 81
Part III Entertainment and the Politics of Class
8 Affluent Class and Corporate Brass in the Make-Believe Mediap. 91
9 There He Is, Miss America: Howard Stern's Deconstruction of Media Imagesp. 104
10 Popular Populism: Political Messages in Country Music Lyricsp. 111
Part IV Popular Culture and the Decline of Civil Society
11 The Collapse of Popular Culture and the Case for Censorshipp. 122
12 A Filmmaker's Credo: Some Thoughts on Politics, History, and the Moviesp. 135
13 TV Vice? Sex and Violence Aren't the Problemp. 142
14 The Shelter of Each Other: One Big Townp. 148

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