Cover image for The search for lost cities
Title:
The search for lost cities
Author:
Barber, Nicola.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Austin, Tex. : Raintree Steck-Vaughn, 1998.
Physical Description:
47 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color maps ; 29 cm.
Summary:
Discusses such ancient "lost" cities as Machu Picchu, Troy, Knossos, Great Zimbabwe, and Angkor, as well as more modern ghost towns.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.3 2.0 28634.
ISBN:
9780817248406
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
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Clarence Library CC176 .B37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eden Library CC176 .B37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library CC176 .B37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library CC176 .B37 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Discusses such ancient lost cities as Machu Picchu, Troy, Knossos, Great Zimbabwe, and Angkor, as well as more modern ghost towns.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Gr. 4^-6. The Treasure Hunters series brings archaeology to a popular level kids can enjoy. Lost Cities devotes a spread each to such ancient lost cities as Troy, Knossos, Pompeii, and Ankor Wat. Although the writing is a bit stiff in places, the imaginations of middle graders will be caught by the drama of those civilizations lost and then found. Tombs deals with a topic of natural interest to kids, and the text is wide ranging, discussing everything from the expected Egyptian tombs to the royal tombs of China, the Roman catacombs, and even shipboard burials. Both volumes are in the usual series format, oversize, with plenty of sidebars and color illustrations that vary in quality; however, the photographs and historical reproductions are well chosen and intriguing. A glossary and a bibliography round out each book. See the Series Roundup, this issue, for other titles in the series. --Ilene Cooper


School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-7‘By accentuating the discoveries of "lost" cities, rather than their histories, Barber appeals to students' senses of adventure and mystery, but her account does not ignore the historical material adventurers and archaeologists have added to humanity's store of knowledge. The author also notes the somewhat casual excavating styles of early explorers, the hardships they endured, and the sometimes unusual ideas they held concerning their finds. Well illustrated with new paintings and photographs of historical sites and finds, Lost Cities also has the virtue of being broadly based: its scope ranges from Knossos and Angkor Wat in the old world to Machu Picchu and Virginia City in the new. Ancillary sidebars and attractive maps help break up and expand upon the main text; there are a few cross-references within the text. The book closes with a helpful glossary, a list for further reading of titles published from 1989 to 1995, and an extensive index.‘Coop Renner, Coldwell Elementary- Intermediate School, El Paso, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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