Cover image for Unconquered people : Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians
Title:
Unconquered people : Florida's Seminole and Miccosukee Indians
Author:
Weisman, Brent Richards, 1952-
Publication Information:
Gainesville : University Press of Florida, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
x, 170 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Becoming Seminole -- Camp and clan -- Red stick, white plumes -- Big water, grass river -- Of busks and bundles -- Cows, corn, and Coontie -- Patchwork and polyester: Seminoles and Miccosukees in the modern world -- On the Seminole trail.
Reading Level:
1390 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780813016627

9780813016634
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E99.S28 W434 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Explores Seminole and Miccosukee culture through information provided by archaeology, ethnography, historical documents, and the oral histories of the Indians.


Author Notes

Brent Richards Weisman is a member of the anthropology faculty at the University of South Florida in Tampa. He is the author of Excavations on the Franciscan Frontier: Archaeology of the Fig Springs Mission (UPF, 1992), Crystal River: A Ceremonial Mound Center on the Florida Gulf Coast, and Like Beads on a String: A Culture History of the Seminole Indians in North Peninsular Florida.


Table of Contents

Jerald T. Milanich, series editor
Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Chapter 1. Becoming Seminolep. 5
The Ancestral Creek Traditionp. 6
Diversity in the Creek Traditionp. 11
From Creek to Seminolep. 13
William Bartram Meets the Seminolesp. 16
Life and Death among the Alachua Seminolesp. 21
Seminoles in the Tallahassee Red Hillsp. 25
How Did the Seminoles Become Seminole?p. 26
The Seminoles Make Themselvesp. 27
Chapter 2. Camp and Clanp. 30
What Would a Clan Camp Look Like?p. 32
Continuity and Change in Seminole Clansp. 36
Chapter 3. Red Sticks, White Plumesp. 43
Cultures on a Collision Coursep. 43
Containment and Removalp. 45
Red Sticks Fight Backp. 47
Florida Aflamep. 49
Conflicts Unresolved: The Billy Bowlegs Warp. 58
A Spirit Rekindledp. 59
Chapter 4. Big Water, Grass Riverp. 66
The Bad Countryp. 69
Life on the Everglades Fringep. 72
The Cultural Landscape of the Big Cypressp. 77
Early Seminole Settlement in the Evergladesp. 79
The Question of the Spanish Indiansp. 80
The Pine Island Ridge and Seminole Settlement in the Eastern Evergladesp. 83
Okeechobee Groups--Catfish Creekp. 87
Chapter 5. Of Busks and Bundlesp. 90
First Glimpses of the Green Corn Dancep. 91
The Medicinep. 96
Seminole Ball Gamep. 102
The Hunting Dancep. 105
Chapter 6. Cows, Corn, and Coontiep. 107
Early Seminole Farmers and Herdersp. 107
Going to the Coontie Groundsp. 110
The Curious Case of the Seminole Bananap. 115
The Technology of the Seminole Food Questp. 116
Chapter 7. Patchwork and Polyester: Seminoles and Miccosukees in the Modern Worldp. 121
New Ways of Lifep. 123
A New Godp. 126
Reservation Lifep. 127
Two Nationsp. 130
Seminoles and Archaeologists: Common Ground?p. 133
Challenges to a New Generationp. 135
Chapter 8. On the Seminole Trailp. 136
Panhandle: Tallahassee and Points Westp. 137
North Florida: Tallahassee to Bushnellp. 141
Central Florida: Bushnell to Sebringp. 149
South Florida: Sebring Southp. 153
For Further Informationp. 162
Further Readingp. 165
Timelinep. 168

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