Cover image for Erskine Caldwell : selected letters, 1929-1955
Title:
Erskine Caldwell : selected letters, 1929-1955
Author:
Caldwell, Erskine, 1903-1987.
Uniform Title:
Correspondence. Selections
Publication Information:
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
ix, 249 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780786401086
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3505.A322 Z48 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Caldwell''s vision of Southern slack-jawed, pellagra-ridden sharecroppers, repressed farmwives, oversexed nymphets and moronic adolescents elicited praise from F. Scott Fitzgerald and revulsion from others. This is a selection of his letters.'


Author Notes

Erskine Caldwell has been called one of the most banned and censored authors in the United States. The son of a traveling minister, born in White Oak, Georgia in 1903, Caldwell received little formal education, as a young man, Caldwell took odd jobs and worked in the Southern states. He attended briefly Erskine College, Due West, South Carolina, and the Universities of Virginia and Pennsylvania for some semesters. Yet he became a prolific writer whose novels explore the seamy side of life in the American South.

At the age of eighteen he went on a gun-running boat to South America, he played professional football and worked as mill-hand, cotton-picker, and in other such occupations. For a time Caldwell was a cub reporter on the Atlanta Journal. In the 1920s Caldwell moved to Maine to devote himself to writing. After several Spartan years, he had three stories accepted for publication. In 1930 Caldwell destroyed all his unpublished work from previous years. 'Country Full of Swedes' was published in the Yale Review, and it received $1,000 award from the journal in 1933. American Earth, a collection of short stories about petty passions and little lecheries, was published in 1931. Some of the stories had first appeared in such magazines as The American Caravan, Blues, Frankfurter Zeitung, Front, The Hound and Horn, Nativity, Pagany, Scribner's Magazine, This Quarter, and transition. The title of one of his novels Tobacco Road (1932) became slang for poverty and degeneracy. The book was made into both a movie (1941) and a long-running Broadway show (1933-1941). Other novels, some of which were made into later films, include The Bastard (1929), Poor Fool (1930), and God's Little Acre (1933). By the late 1940's, Caldwell had sold more books than any writer in the nation's history.

Caldwell became a reporter for the Atlanta Journal in 1925, worked as a scriptwriter in Hollywood and was a newspaper correspondent in Mexico, Spain, Czechoslovakia, Russia and China. In 1984, Caldwell was elected, along with Norman Mailer, to the fifty-chair body of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Caldwell is the author of 25 novels, 150 short stories and 12 nonfiction books.

He died in Paradise Valley, Arizona on April 11, 1987.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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