Cover image for Dealing crack : the social world of streetcorner selling
Title:
Dealing crack : the social world of streetcorner selling
Author:
Jacobs, Bruce A. (Bruce Abel), 1968-
Publication Information:
Boston : Northeastern University Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xiii, 163 pages ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781555533885

9781555533878
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library HV5825 .J3 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

An exploration of the crack cocaine trade from the perspective of the American sellers. The author examines the underlying motivations for selling crack, describes the social organization of dealing, and explores how dealers protect transactions from law enforcement, police, and other criminals.


Summary

During the 1980s, addiction to crack cocaine escalated at an alarming rate. As the demand for crack grew, so did the economic opportunities for entrepreneurial street dealers, who developed criminal underground networks for the supply and retail sale of the high-profit substance. While crack cocaine use has since plateaued and is on the decline, hard-core dealers persist in selling the increasingly unprofitable drug in a high-risk, competitive street market.

Bruce A. Jacobs bases his study on dangerous field research conducted in one of the most socially distressed and impoverished neighborhoods in St. Louis. Drawing on no-holds-barred interviews with active dealers, as well as on his own eyewitness observations of transactions and encounters with police, Jacobs captures the crack business as it actually operates on the streets.

He examines the underlying motivations for selling crack, describes the complex and intricate social organization of dealing, and explores how dealers protect transactions from law enforcement, undercover police, and criminal predators. Quoting extensively from his conversations with offenders, he conveys much of the fear and aura surrounding the process and lifestyle of crack cocaine dealing.

This provocative volume is appropriate for a variety of courses in criminal justice and social problems and gives general readers an inside look at one of America's most troubling problems.


Author Notes

Bruce A. Jacobs is Assistant Professor of Criminology at the University of Missouri--St. Louis.


Bruce A. Jacobs is Assistant Professor of Criminology at the University of Missouri--St. Louis.


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Although the use of crack cocaine is declining, its devastating social impact is still very much in evidence. Jacobs, a sociology professor, details that devastation and the low-level street enterprise involved in selling crack. Jacobs studied the crack trade of inner-city St. Louis and interviewed 34 dealers to learn how and why so many urban youth choose the risks and slim rewards of crack dealing over legitimate enterprises. He details the operations of the freelance, gang-affiliated dealers: securing product, packaging, competing for a dwindling, dangerous client base, and dodging the police. Jacobs' interviews reveal the dealers' contradictions: awareness of the destructive nature of the product they sell but refusing to accept responsibility for its consequences; scornful of the meager wages available to the unskilled but unwilling to adapt their personae to be more socially acceptable. This well-researched book is an engrossing exploration of a troubling social issue. --Vanessa Bush


Library Journal Review

This book is a report on Jacobs's ethnographic fieldwork among crack dealers in one neighborhood in St. Louis. The chapter subjects include motivation and social organization of dealers, predators in street drug sales, police (and undercover officers), and dealing in the current declining market, as well as background on the crack epidemic and research methodology. A criminology professor at the University of Missouri, St. Louis, Jacobs writes about his fascinating experiences with insight. By interviewing and studying dealers in their natural settings, he also runs into risky situations with potentially dangerous felons and some unfriendly police. Highly recommended for scholars, students, and professionals in criminal justice (and the interested general public), both for the methodology and for the carefully gathered detail on one group of offenders. There have been a number of recent studies on the patterns of selling, purchasing, and using crack and cocaine, including a study on selling crack in Harlem (Philippe T. Bourgois, In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio, LJ 11/15/95). Jacobs's book is a valuable addition to that literature.‘Mary Jane Brustman, SUNY at Albany Libs. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Although the use of crack cocaine is declining, its devastating social impact is still very much in evidence. Jacobs, a sociology professor, details that devastation and the low-level street enterprise involved in selling crack. Jacobs studied the crack trade of inner-city St. Louis and interviewed 34 dealers to learn how and why so many urban youth choose the risks and slim rewards of crack dealing over legitimate enterprises. He details the operations of the freelance, gang-affiliated dealers: securing product, packaging, competing for a dwindling, dangerous client base, and dodging the police. Jacobs' interviews reveal the dealers' contradictions: awareness of the destructive nature of the product they sell but refusing to accept responsibility for its consequences; scornful of the meager wages available to the unskilled but unwilling to adapt their personae to be more socially acceptable. This well-researched book is an engrossing exploration of a troubling social issue. --Vanessa Bush


Library Journal Review

This book is a report on Jacobs's ethnographic fieldwork among crack dealers in one neighborhood in St. Louis. The chapter subjects include motivation and social organization of dealers, predators in street drug sales, police (and undercover officers), and dealing in the current declining market, as well as background on the crack epidemic and research methodology. A criminology professor at the University of Missouri, St. Louis, Jacobs writes about his fascinating experiences with insight. By interviewing and studying dealers in their natural settings, he also runs into risky situations with potentially dangerous felons and some unfriendly police. Highly recommended for scholars, students, and professionals in criminal justice (and the interested general public), both for the methodology and for the carefully gathered detail on one group of offenders. There have been a number of recent studies on the patterns of selling, purchasing, and using crack and cocaine, including a study on selling crack in Harlem (Philippe T. Bourgois, In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio, LJ 11/15/95). Jacobs's book is a valuable addition to that literature.‘Mary Jane Brustman, SUNY at Albany Libs. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
1 Researching Crackp. 3
2 Motivationp26
3 Social Organizationp. 43
4 Predatorsp. 66
5 Policep. 85
6 Undercover Policep. 103
7 Crack in Declinep. 118
Notesp. 131
Selected Bibliographyp. 151
Indexp. 159
Forewordp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
1 Researching Crackp. 3
2 Motivationp26
3 Social Organizationp. 43
4 Predatorsp. 66
5 Policep. 85
6 Undercover Policep. 103
7 Crack in Declinep. 118
Notesp. 131
Selected Bibliographyp. 151
Indexp. 159

Google Preview