Cover image for Skywoman : legends of the Iroquois
Title:
Skywoman : legends of the Iroquois
Author:
Shenandoah, Joanne.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Santa Fe, N.M. : Clear Light Publishers, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
108 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780940666993
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Clarence Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Clearfield Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Concord Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Elma Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Hamburg Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lancaster Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Anna M. Reinstein Library E99.I7 S448 1998 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

When Skywoman falls from the upper world, the birds and animals living in the watery place below must catch her and create ground on which she can stand. Thus Turtle Island, the earth, is born. In this beautifully illustrated book, two Native American writers tell the ancient stories of the Iroquois Peoples. Skywoman is storytelling at its best. It will be enjoyed by young and old, by everyone who treasures the wisdom and traditions of the first Americans.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8‘Shenandoah-Tekalihwa:khwa and George-Kanentiio retell nine traditional Iroquois tales. In a series of creation stories, readers learn how Skywoman fell from the world above, how the animals spread mud on the back of a turtle to catch her and the Earth was born, how the moon was formed, and how human beings were created. Other tales describe the origin of the dancing star constellation and of the evergreen. One selection tells "How the Bear Clan Became Healers" and another describes a sea creature in Lake Ontario. Full-color single- and double-page spreads and black-and-white pen-and-ink drawings depict the action and provide cultural details. The dignity and clarity so much a part of Native American storytelling are evident in this volume. Joseph Bruchac has included some of the stories in his Iroquois Stories (Crossing, 1985) and Native American Stories (Fulcrum, 1991). Although the selections in Skywoman subtly work in Iroquois traditions, there is no introduction explaining Iroquois history or customs and no source notes are provided. Still, the combination of solid writing and evocative artwork make this book a worthwhile purchase for libraries needing additional Native American legends.‘Cheryl Cufari, Glencliff Elementary School, Niskayuna, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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