Cover image for In my enemy's house
Title:
In my enemy's house
Author:
Matas, Carol, 1949-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 1999.
Physical Description:
167 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
When German soldiers arrive in Zloczow during World War II, a young Jewish girl must decide whether or not to conceal her identity and work for a Nazi in Germany in order to survive.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
560 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 4.5 6.0 35282.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 6.3 11 Quiz: 22006 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780689813542
Format :
Book

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Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Young Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

When German soldiers arrive in Zloczow during World War II, a young Jewish girl must decide whether or not to conceal her identity and work for a Nazi in Germany in order to survive.


Author Notes

Writer Carol Matas was born in Canada in 1949.

Matas was an actress and currently teaches writing.

Matas is best known for her historical adventures. These often feature young people caught up in the world's problems. "Daniel's Story," about a young Jewish boy in Nazi Germany, was short-listed for the 1993 Governor General's Award and the 1994 Ruth Schwartz Award and won the Silver Birch Award. Lisa won the Geoffrey Bilson Award and was a New York Times Book Review Notable of 1989.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Gr. 7-10. "I survived. Protected by the Nazis that killed my family. Could I ever forgive myself?" With her blond hair and blue eyes, Marisa, 15, looks like the Aryan ideal, and when the Nazis invade Poland and round up and massacre her Jewish family and friends, she passes as Polish and moves to Germany, where she works first for a brutish farmer and then for a cultured Nazi family. Matas' fine docu-novels, from Daniel's Story (1993) to After the War (1996), all draw on survivors' testimony to tell of the Holocaust experience through the eyes of young people. This story holds you not only with the authentic account of the Jewish girl in hiding in disguise right in the jaws of the enemy but also with the intimate view of the Nazi home. How could these people be so kind and yet murder and condone murder and torture with no problem? She watches the children play the board game Jews Out, and she helps them with their lessons that teach them that Jews are not even of the human race. The brutal details of the genocide are always there (the children have photos of German soldiers with their guns aimed at naked men, women, and children), and Marisa sees how you can become numb to the suffering of those who are dehumanized. Always she struggles with the overriding moral question: How could God allow such evil? (Reviewed February 1, 1999)0689813546Hazel Rochman


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