Cover image for Dosso Dossi : court painter in Renaissance Ferrara
Title:
Dosso Dossi : court painter in Renaissance Ferrara
Author:
Humfrey, Peter, 1947-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : The Metropolitan Museum of Art : Distributed by H.N. Abrams, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xvi, 312 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 31 cm
General Note:
Catalog of an exhibition held at the Pinacoteca nazionale, Ferrara, Sept. 26-Dec. 14, 1998, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Jan. 14-Mar. 28, 1999, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Apr. 27-July 11, 1999.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780870998751

9780870998768

9780810965300
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library ND623.D65 A4 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

A fresh and comprehensive scholarly discussion of nearly all of the surviving paintings by the brilliant sixteenth-century court painter Dosso Dossi and of his career and work.


Summary

Imagination, sensual delight, a sharp wit--these qualities were enormously prized in sixteenth-century Ferrara, where one of the most cultured and powerful courts of the High Renaissance held sway. Dosso Dossi was the idiosyncratic, brilliant painter most responsible for turning those values into a glorious artistic reality. Dosso's rich color schemes are akin to those of his fellow North Italian Titian; he learned something about innovative composition from Raphael and about the force of the body from Michelangelo, but his paintings have a very individual appeal. In leafy natural surroundings containing an array of animals and heavenly bodies, events unfold that are often enigmatic, enacted by characters whose interrelationships elude definition. Dosso's painted world shares the spirit of contemporaneous epic poetry - such as Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso - "imbued as it is with mystery and transformation, energy and invention.
Along with his predecessor Giorgione, Dosso was one of the first painters to improvise on the canvas. Rather than following careful preparatory drawings, he composed and recomposed as he painted - a remarkably free process that is clearly revealed in new x-ray and infrared photographs. Dosso's virtuosic painting performance was thus itself a kind of magical invention. The play of his imagination is evident not only in the many pictures representing mythological or literary subjects but also in his religious paintings, which are lyrical and original, filled with spectacular visual effects and touches of humor.
When Ferrara's fortunes changed, at the end of the sixteenth century, most of Dosso's paintings were taken to Rome and ultimately dispersed. For this exhibition, almost all the surviving paintings have been brought together; in the catalogue entries each one receives a fresh and comprehensive scholarly discussion. The catalogue also contains essays that describe Dosso's artistic career and the highly charged world of the court at Ferrara and that probe the visual poetry and subtle wit of his work. The illuminating results of an extensive campaign of technical examination, undertaken in connection with the exhibition, are discussed and illustrated in additional essays and in observations that accompany the catalogue entries throughout. The book includes a full review of the scholarly literature, color reproductions of the paintings, many comparative illustrations, a chronology, and a complete bibliography. This book was originally published in 1998 and has gone out of print. This edition is a print-on-demand version of the original book.]


Summary

The court of Ferrara was a leading center of Renaissance art in the 16th century, and Dosso Dossi was its greatest and most idiosyncratic painter. This book, which accompanies the first major exhibition of Dosso's work, includes nearly all his surviving paintings -- mythological, literary, and religious.

While Dosso learned much from his contemporaries Titian, Raphael, and Michelangelo, he developed a unique style marked by imagination, sensual delight, and sharp wit. Here, each painting is reproduced and discussed in detail, and essays by eminent scholars explore Dosso's career, probe the visual poetry of his works, and present important new documentary information as well as technical analyses of his innovative working methods.


Reviews 6

Library Journal Review

This exhibition catalog should generate interest in a northern Italian painter whose name is not as recognizable as that of some of his early 16th-century contemporaries. Dosso Dossi's art shows awareness of current trends in the work of Giorgione, Titian, Raphael, Michelangelo, Giovanni Bellini, Mantegna, Giulio Romano, Patinir, and Drer. The blending of these influences in Dosso's religious and secular paintings is discussed in essays by Humfrey (art history, Univ. of St. Andrews), Lucco (art history, Univ. of Bologna), and five curators and conservators. The contributors also explore the characteristics of Dosso's poetic and often witty individual style, how it flourished in the humanist environment of the D'Este court, and the extent of his collaboration with his brother Battista and others. Technical analyses give insights into Dosso's improvisational painting techniques. The Met has collaborated with the Getty Museum, Italian organizations, and private collectors to organize a traveling exhibition of 58 works and this beautifully illustrated scholarly catalog. Recommended for academic and art libraries with Renaissance collections.ÄAnne Marie Lane, Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Dosso probably gets the prize as the Renaissance artist most famous in his time who is least famous now. Moreover, having been known as a great developer of the landscape genre, he is now most notable for his intriguing and not-merely-complex iconographies, a genuine heir of Giorgione in this respect. Sixteen landscapes built into the Duke's bedchamber at Ferrara are lost, but such charming subjects as the great good witch Melissa; Jupiter Painting the Wings of Butterflies, after a dialogue by everybody's favorite humanist Alberti; an Allegory with Pan under a luscious lemon tree; The Dream, one of those rare Italian spinoffs from Bosch; ceiling rhomboids that include an unforgettable characterization of Drunkenness; and a subtle tete-a-tete, Conversation. Dosso is fun to look at for more than his landscapes, a provincial in the best sense. As is typically the case now, this catalog is a substantial contribution that replaces the older monograph by Felton Gibbons, Dosso and Battista Dossi: Court Painters at Ferrara (CH, Mar'69). A special feature is the paragraph on technical observations included with each entry. Beautifully illustrated, equipped with full scholarly apparatus, authored by distinguished professors of international reputation; a better book on Dosso is hard to imagine. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. P. Emison University of New Hampshire


Library Journal Review

This exhibition catalog should generate interest in a northern Italian painter whose name is not as recognizable as that of some of his early 16th-century contemporaries. Dosso Dossi's art shows awareness of current trends in the work of Giorgione, Titian, Raphael, Michelangelo, Giovanni Bellini, Mantegna, Giulio Romano, Patinir, and Drer. The blending of these influences in Dosso's religious and secular paintings is discussed in essays by Humfrey (art history, Univ. of St. Andrews), Lucco (art history, Univ. of Bologna), and five curators and conservators. The contributors also explore the characteristics of Dosso's poetic and often witty individual style, how it flourished in the humanist environment of the D'Este court, and the extent of his collaboration with his brother Battista and others. Technical analyses give insights into Dosso's improvisational painting techniques. The Met has collaborated with the Getty Museum, Italian organizations, and private collectors to organize a traveling exhibition of 58 works and this beautifully illustrated scholarly catalog. Recommended for academic and art libraries with Renaissance collections.ÄAnne Marie Lane, Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Dosso probably gets the prize as the Renaissance artist most famous in his time who is least famous now. Moreover, having been known as a great developer of the landscape genre, he is now most notable for his intriguing and not-merely-complex iconographies, a genuine heir of Giorgione in this respect. Sixteen landscapes built into the Duke's bedchamber at Ferrara are lost, but such charming subjects as the great good witch Melissa; Jupiter Painting the Wings of Butterflies, after a dialogue by everybody's favorite humanist Alberti; an Allegory with Pan under a luscious lemon tree; The Dream, one of those rare Italian spinoffs from Bosch; ceiling rhomboids that include an unforgettable characterization of Drunkenness; and a subtle tete-a-tete, Conversation. Dosso is fun to look at for more than his landscapes, a provincial in the best sense. As is typically the case now, this catalog is a substantial contribution that replaces the older monograph by Felton Gibbons, Dosso and Battista Dossi: Court Painters at Ferrara (CH, Mar'69). A special feature is the paragraph on technical observations included with each entry. Beautifully illustrated, equipped with full scholarly apparatus, authored by distinguished professors of international reputation; a better book on Dosso is hard to imagine. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. P. Emison University of New Hampshire


Library Journal Review

This exhibition catalog should generate interest in a northern Italian painter whose name is not as recognizable as that of some of his early 16th-century contemporaries. Dosso Dossi's art shows awareness of current trends in the work of Giorgione, Titian, Raphael, Michelangelo, Giovanni Bellini, Mantegna, Giulio Romano, Patinir, and Drer. The blending of these influences in Dosso's religious and secular paintings is discussed in essays by Humfrey (art history, Univ. of St. Andrews), Lucco (art history, Univ. of Bologna), and five curators and conservators. The contributors also explore the characteristics of Dosso's poetic and often witty individual style, how it flourished in the humanist environment of the D'Este court, and the extent of his collaboration with his brother Battista and others. Technical analyses give insights into Dosso's improvisational painting techniques. The Met has collaborated with the Getty Museum, Italian organizations, and private collectors to organize a traveling exhibition of 58 works and this beautifully illustrated scholarly catalog. Recommended for academic and art libraries with Renaissance collections.ÄAnne Marie Lane, Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Dosso probably gets the prize as the Renaissance artist most famous in his time who is least famous now. Moreover, having been known as a great developer of the landscape genre, he is now most notable for his intriguing and not-merely-complex iconographies, a genuine heir of Giorgione in this respect. Sixteen landscapes built into the Duke's bedchamber at Ferrara are lost, but such charming subjects as the great good witch Melissa; Jupiter Painting the Wings of Butterflies, after a dialogue by everybody's favorite humanist Alberti; an Allegory with Pan under a luscious lemon tree; The Dream, one of those rare Italian spinoffs from Bosch; ceiling rhomboids that include an unforgettable characterization of Drunkenness; and a subtle tete-a-tete, Conversation. Dosso is fun to look at for more than his landscapes, a provincial in the best sense. As is typically the case now, this catalog is a substantial contribution that replaces the older monograph by Felton Gibbons, Dosso and Battista Dossi: Court Painters at Ferrara (CH, Mar'69). A special feature is the paragraph on technical observations included with each entry. Beautifully illustrated, equipped with full scholarly apparatus, authored by distinguished professors of international reputation; a better book on Dosso is hard to imagine. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. P. Emison University of New Hampshire


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