Cover image for Voices of the Old South : eyewitness accounts, 1528-1861
Title:
Voices of the Old South : eyewitness accounts, 1528-1861
Author:
Gallay, Alan, 1957-
Publication Information:
Athens : University of Georgia Press, [1994]

©1994
Physical Description:
xxix, 404 pages ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca -- Rodrigo Ranjel -- Nicolas Le Challeux -- Pedro Menendez de Aviles -- John Smith -- Lady Mary Wyatt -- Pierre and Jean-Baptiste Talon -- John Lawson -- Andre Penicaut -- Edmond Atkin -- Edward Kimber -- James Adair -- William Bartram -- Bernard Romans -- Benjamin Martyn -- John Martin Bolzius -- William Bartram -- William Byrd -- Philip Vickers Fithian -- Josiah Quincy, Jr. -- Eliza Lucas Pinckney -- John and Ann Harrower -- William Byrd -- Devereux Jarratt -- Charles Woodmason -- Thomas Stephens -- Bernard Romans -- John Martin Bolzius -- Geroge Whitefield -- Landon Carter -- Thomas Jefferson -- William Dunbar.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780820315652

9780820315669
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library F212 .V65 1994 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library F212 .V65 1994 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

"Spanning the period from the earliest European expeditions to the eve of the Civil War, Voices of the Old South assembles a fascinating array of firsthand perspectives on the great events that shaped the region as well as its customs, attitudes, and commonplace occurrences." "Encompassing key themes in southern history, the eyewitness accounts Alan Gallay has brought together for this volume are remarkable in their variety. In addition, Gallay's selections reflect a multicultural approach in which African Americans, native Americans, and women are treated not as mere tokens but as major participants in southern life." "Unlike many works on the Old South, which tend to focus on the immediate pre-war years, this volume gives equal attention to the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Its geographic definition of the region is notably broad, including not only British America but also French Louisiana, the mountain areas as well as the lowlands, the pine barrens and the cotton belt. While famous names - such as Thomas Jefferson, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Frances Anne Kemble - can be found here, Gallay also features writings by a number of obscure or less familiar figures. A French carpenter's account of an ill-fated expedition in Florida, a Scottish tradesman's description of the social mores of Georgia and the Carolinas, a free black's journal of daily life in Natchez, Mississippithese are but a few of the rare and unusual documents excerpted in the book." "In his introduction, Gallay explains the diversity of his selections, contending that to identify common threads among particular groups is not enough: we must also understand how the common threads take different forms when they penetrate different subcultures. By allowing the reader to listen to the richly divergent voices of those who lived in or visited the Old South, this collection suggests some fruitful ways of reaching that understanding."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved


Summary

Spanning the period from the earliest European expeditions to the eve of the Civil War, Voices of the Old South assembles a fascinating array of firsthand perspectives on the great events that shaped the region as well as its customs, attitudes, and commonplace occurrences. Encompassing key themes in southern history, the eyewitness accounts Alan Gallay has brought together for this volume are remarkable in their variety. In addition, Gallay's selections reflect a multicultural approach in which African Americans, native Americans, and women are treated not as mere tokens but as major participants in southern life.

Unlike many works on the Old South, which tend to focus on the immediate pre-war years, this volume gives equal attention to the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Its geographic definition of the region is notably broad, including not only British America but also French Louisiana, the mountain areas as well as the lowlands, the pine barrens and the cotton belt. While famous names-such as Thomas Jefferson, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, and Frances Anne Kemble-can be found here, Gallay also features writings by a number of obscure or less familiar figures. A French carpenter's account of an ill-fated expedition in Florida, a Scottish tradesman's description of the social mores of Georgia and the Carolinas, a free black's journal of daily life in Natchez, Mississippi-these are but a few of the rare and unusual documents excerpted in the book.

In his introduction, Gallay explains the diversity of his selections, contending that to identify common threads among particular groups is not enough: we must also understand how the common threads take different forms when they penetrate different subcultures. By allowing the reader to listen to the richly divergent voices of those who lived in or visited the Old South, this collection suggests some fruitful ways of reaching that understanding.


Author Notes

Alan Gallay is the Warner Woodring Chair of Atlantic World and Early American History at Ohio State University, where he is also Director of the Center for Historical Research. His books include The Formation of a Planter Elite (Georgia) and The Indian Slave Trade , winner of the 2003 Bancroft Prize.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

In keeping with the current trend of social historians, Gallay (Western Washington Univ.) has collected and carefully edited a representative collection of a broad and diverse range of firsthand primary source accounts that depict the forces and experiences that defined the antebellum South. The volume covers a variety of geopolitical areas within the South--from the South Carolina low country to the Louisiana bayous to the Kentucky Bluegrass Region--from a multicultural perspective. Not only are the voices of elite white males heard; there are also keen observations from African Americans, women, poor whites, Amerindians, ethnic groups, abolitionists, proslavery zealots, and critical foreign observers from the colonial period to the outbreak of the Civil War. This work clearly surpasses Eugene Schwab's Travels in the Old South (1973) and can be used effectively by the general reader and specialized scholar.-- Charles C. Hay III, Eastern Kentucky Univ. Archives, Richmond (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

In keeping with the current trend of social historians, Gallay (Western Washington Univ.) has collected and carefully edited a representative collection of a broad and diverse range of firsthand primary source accounts that depict the forces and experiences that defined the antebellum South. The volume covers a variety of geopolitical areas within the South--from the South Carolina low country to the Louisiana bayous to the Kentucky Bluegrass Region--from a multicultural perspective. Not only are the voices of elite white males heard; there are also keen observations from African Americans, women, poor whites, Amerindians, ethnic groups, abolitionists, proslavery zealots, and critical foreign observers from the colonial period to the outbreak of the Civil War. This work clearly surpasses Eugene Schwab's Travels in the Old South (1973) and can be used effectively by the general reader and specialized scholar.-- Charles C. Hay III, Eastern Kentucky Univ. Archives, Richmond (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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