Cover image for Atelier Lotte Jacobi, Berlin, New York
Title:
Atelier Lotte Jacobi, Berlin, New York
Author:
Jacobi, Lotte, 1896-1990.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Berlin : Verborgene Museum : Nicolai, 1998.
Physical Description:
224 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
General Note:
"The original German version of this book ...was published in conjunction with the exhibition ... shown at Das Verborgene Museum, Berlin, January 23-March 23, 1997; Suermondt Ludwig Museum Aachen, April 5-May 25, 1997; Museum Ostdeutsche Galerie Regensburg, June 8-July 13, 1997." -- t.p. verso
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9783875846362
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TR681.F3 J3 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

One of the most important and widely anticipated photography monographs in recent memory, this book phy monographs in recent memory, this book provides a much-needed, comprehensive overview of the life, work, and times of one of the twentieth century's seminal photographers. Besides her dazzling studies of light and shadow, and her triumphant cityscapes, Lotte Jacobi was one of the medium's premiere portraitists. Among this book's more than four hundred duotone images are her pictures of an impressive array of intellectuals and cultural figures, including Einstein, Thomas Mann, Robert Frost, J.D. Salinger, Paul Robeson, Lotte Lenya, Eleanor Roosevelt, and many others. Perhaps as engrossing as her work was her life, and Lotte Jacobi's biography is given the most detailed and complete treatment yet in this book. As a woman who overcame the sexism so innate to her times, and as a European expatriate forced from the tumult of the old world across the continent and finally to America, Lotte Jacobi led a truly epic life. This book is a fitting tribute to her photographs and her story.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

This book was first published in Germany to accompany a traveling exhibition on Lotte Jacobi's photographic legacy. When she went into exile in 1935, Jacobi took only a tiny portion of the studio and stage portraits she had produced at Atelier Jacobi in Berlin (1927-35). These portraits, along with her work in the Soviet Union and the United States, comprise the collection of negatives bequeathed to the University of New Hampshire, which produced fresh prints for this project. Interviews with Jacobi and her associates and friends bolster the excellent biographical essays. Beautifully reproduced portraits of Peter Lorre, Albert Einstein, Eleanor Roosevelt, Robert Frost, Thomas Mann, Alfred Stieglitz, and Marc Chagall appear alongside the faces of Berlin performers new to most Americans, as well as views of the Soviet Union, London, New York, and Deering, NH, where Jacobi worked in the last years of her life. This well-researched book on one of the most important photographers of the 20th century should be in every photohistory and art photography collection.¬ĎKathleen Collins, Bank of America Archives, San Francisco (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Beckers and Moortgat present a comprehensive overview of Jacobi's extraordinary life and photographic work. Under the threat of German Nazism, she emigrated to the US in 1935, after she was forced to close a photographic practice that spanned four generations of the Atelier Jacobi. As a renowned portraitist, Jacobi photographed the great personalities of her time in Berlin--the intellectuals, the visual, performing, and literary artists that shaped the era. Her career continued to flourish in New York City, most notably, with Alfred Einstein for Life magazine in 1939, Eleanor Roosevelt, Thomas Mann, Marc Chagall, J.D. Salinger, and Alfred Steiglitz, among others. Then unexpectedly, influenced by the work of Moholy Nagy and the youthful abstract art movements, she embarked on an exploration of photogenics--camera-less images created directly with light in the darkroom. From 1947 to 1955, she created dazzling abstract studies of light and shadow. This volume richly evidences her contributions to the field and substantiates her remarkable achievements with more than 200 duotone reproductions drawn from the Lotte Jacobi Negative Archives at the University of New Hampshire; biography, notes, and appendix. Undergraduates through professionals. J. Natal; Columbia College (IL)


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