Cover image for Beyond the Great Snow Mountains
Title:
Beyond the Great Snow Mountains
Author:
L'Amour, Louis, 1908-1988.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Bantam Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
282 pages ; 20 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
By the waters of San Tadeo -- Meeting at Falmouth -- Roundup in Texas -- Sideshow champion -- Crash landing -- Under the hanging wall -- Coast patrol -- The gravel pit -- The money punch -- Beyond the Great Snow Mountains -- A note on the dedication.
ISBN:
9780553109634
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Library
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Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Angola Public Library X Adult Fiction Western
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Concord Library X Adult Fiction Western
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Hamburg Library X Adult Fiction Western
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On Order

Summary

Summary

From the wide-open range of the American West to the frozen seas of the Siberian coast, from the deceptive glitter of Hollywood to the bloodstained canvas of the boxing ring, these are stories of war, mystery, romance, crime, and punishment as only Louis L'Amour can tell them. Here are vintage L'Amour stories of men and women pitted against impossible odds, yet struggling to do what's right: a hard-bitten cattle driver must deal with a man trying to steal his woman, the disappearance of a thousand head of cattle, and a plot to frame him for murder. A private eye visits a remote mining town on a case involving a sexy widow, an uneasy lawman, and a fortune in gold buried in an abandoned mine shaft. A young country boy with a good right hand must fight not only his vicious opponent in the ring but the ruthless gangsters who'll do anything for profit--even commit cold-blooded murder. A young woman stranded with her sick father in an isolated harbor run by a sadistic fortune hunter must call upon all her resources to survive in a brutal battle wits. Filled with L'Amour's trademark blend of action, imagination, historical detail, and fascinating characters, these stories are a welcome addition to the L'Amour legend, revealing the impressive visionary breadth and genius of one of the world's most extraordinary writers.


Author Notes

Born in Jamestown, North Dakota on March 22, 1908, Louis L'Amour's adventurous life could have been the subject of one of his novels. Striking out on his own in 1923, at age 15, L'Amour began a peripatetic existence, taking whatever jobs were available, from skinning dead cattle to being a sailor. L'Amour knew early in life that he wanted to be a writer, and the experiences of those years serve as background for some of his later fiction. During the 1930s he published short stories and poetry; his career was interrupted by army service in World War II. After the war, L'Amour began writing for western pulp magazines and wrote several books in the Hopalong Cassidy series using the pseudonym Tex Burns.

His first novel, Westward the Tide (1950), serves as an example of L'Amour's frontier fiction, for it is an action-packed adventure story containing the themes and motifs that he uses throughout his career. His fascination with history and his belief in the inevitability of manifest destiny are clear. Also present and typical of L'Amour's work are the strong, capable, beautiful heroine who is immediately attracted to the equally capable hero; a clear moral split between good and evil; reflections on the Native Americans, whose land and ways of life are being disrupted; and a happy ending. Although his work is somewhat less violent than that of other western writers, L'Amour's novels all contain their fair share of action, usually in the form of gunfights or fistfights.

L'Amour's major contribution to the western genre is his attempt to create, in 40 or more books, the stories of three families whose histories intertwine as the generations advance across the American frontier. The novels of the Irish Chantry, English Sackett, and French Talon families are L'Amour's most ambitious project, and sadly were left unfinished at his death. Although L'Amour did not complete all of the novels, enough of the series exists to demonstrate his vision.

L'Amour's strongest attribute is his ability to tell a compelling story; readers do not mind if the story is similar to one they have read before, for in the telling, L'Amour adds enough small twists of plot and detail to make it worth the reader's while. L'Amour fans also enjoy the bits of information he includes about everything from wilderness survival skills to finding the right person to marry. These lessons give readers the sense that they are getting their money's worth, that there is more to a L'Amour novel than sheer escapism. With over 200 million copies of his books in print worldwide, L'Amour must be counted as one of the most influential writers of westerns in this century. He died from lung cancer on June 10, 1988.

(Bowker Author Biography) Louis L'Amour, truly America's favorite storyteller, was the first fiction writer ever to receive the Congressional Gold Medal from the United States Congress in honor of his life's work, & was also awarded the Medal of Freedom. There are over 260 million copies of his books in print worldwide.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Written in the 1940s and '50s, the 10 stories in this collection, none previously published in book form, come complete with curvy Hopper-like heroines "shaped to please" whose "eyes you could lose yourself in." The heroesÄboxers, detectives and gunslinging cowboysÄsleuth, shoot and slug their way valiantly through plots that seem like dress rehearsals for the full-blown L'Amour novels. Surprisingly, there is just one true western, a melodramatic horse opera loaded with cattle rustlers, gunfighters and hayseed dialogue. "Meeting at Falmouth," an unconvincing historical fiction, imagines a proud and tragic Benedict Arnold on a rainy night in 1794. "The Money Punch" and "Sideshow Champion" make prizefighting (an early occupation of L'Amour's) the theater for drama, suspense and moral conflict as ambition calls the loyalty and honesty of two young boxers into question. The collection's most successful story, "Under the Hanging Wall," is a clever whodunit with a chiseled gumshoe investigating a murder in a California mining town. Smart foreshadowing and snappy plotting reveal L'Amour to be a skilled mystery writer. Though not sophisticated psychologically, L'Amour's brassy women and dusty men keep the action of these cinematic stories hot. Entertaining and of interest to the devotees of L'Amour's 100-plus books, these adventure tales offer their share of the high drama L'Amour is famous for. Three more collections of yet-unpublished work will follow. (May) FYI: Louis L'Amour, who wrote 90 novels, was the only novelist to receive both the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. There are more than 260 million copies of his books in print. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Much published and widely read, Louis L'Amour is an American literary legend. He died in 1988, leaving 90 published novels, 20 short-story collections, and a handful of nonfiction. He also left plenty of unpublished material, including the tales that make up this collection, the first of four new anthologies scheduled by Bantam. In addition, daughter Angelique L'Amour is currently at work on her father's biography. According to her, these 10 yarns were based on the author's own experiences traveling across half the world or working as a miner, a professional boxer, or any of a dozen other things he did after leaving home at age 15. And, like all L'Amour tales, they are written in a clear, flowing style, peopled by sharply defined characters, and contain plenty of action. Among the highlights are "Under the Hanging Wall," which takes place in a sweltering, out-of-the-way western mining town, and "The Money Punch," a solid boxing story. All together, these tales show a distinctly different but equally intriguing side of Louis L'Amour. --Budd Arthur


Library Journal Review

Ten stories that have never before appeared in book form. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Eight stories of adventure by Louis L'Amour. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Beyond the Great Snow Mountains When the burial was complete, she rode with her son into the hills. The Go-log tribesmen, sharing her sorrow for their lost leader, stood aside and allowed her to go. Lok-sha had been a great man and too young to die. Only in the eyes of Norba and his followers did she detect the triumph born of realization that nothing now stood between him and tribal control. Nothing but a slender woman, alien to their land, and Kulan, her fourteen-year-old son. There was no time to worry now, nor was there time for grief. If ever they were to escape, it must be at once, for it was unlikely such opportunity would again offer itself. It had been fifteen years since the plane in which she was leaving China crashed in the mountains near Tosun Nor, killing all on board but herself. Now, as if decreed by fate, another had come, and this one landed intact. Shambe had brought the news as Lok-sha lay dying, for long ago the far-ranging hunter had promised if ever another plane landed, he would first bring the news to her. If the fierce Go-log tribesmen learned of the landing, they would kill the survivors and destroy the plane. To enter the land of the Go-log was to die. It was a far land of high, grass plateaus, snowcapped mountains, and rushing streams. There among the peaks were born three of the greatest rivers of Asia--the Yellow, the Yangtze, and the Mekong--and there the Go-log lived as they had lived since the time of Genghis Khan. Splendid horsemen and savage fighters, they lived upon their herds of yaks, fat-tailed sheep, horses, and the plunder reaped from caravans bound from China to Tibet. Anna Doone, born on a ranch in Montana, had taken readily to the hard, nomadic life of the Go-log. She had come to China to join her father, a medical missionary, and her uncle, a noted anthropologist. Both were killed in Kansu by the renegade army that had once belonged to General Ma. Anna, with two friends, attempted an escape in an old plane. Riding now toward this other aircraft, she recalled the morning when, standing beside her wrecked plane, she had first watched the Go-log approach. She was familiar with their reputation for killing interlopers, but she had a Winchester with a telescopic sight and a .45 caliber Colt revolver. Despite her fear, she felt a burst of admiration for their superb horsemanship as they raced over the plain. Seeing the rifle ready in her hands, they drew up sharply, and her eyes for the first time looked upon Lok-sha. Only a little older than her own twenty-one years, he was a tall man with a lean horseman's build, and he laughed with pure enjoyment when she lifted the rifle. She was to remember that laugh for a long time, for the Go-log were normally a somber people. Lok-sha had the commanding presence of the born leader of men, and she realized at once that if she were to survive, it would be because he wished it. He spoke sharply in his own tongue, and she replied in the dialect of Kansu, which fortunately he understood. "It is a fine weapon," he said about the rifle. "I do not wish to use it against the Go-log. I come as a friend." "The Go-log have no friends." A small herd of Tibetan antelope appeared on the crest of a low ridge some three hundred yards away, looking curiously toward the crashed plane. She had used a rifle since she was a child, killing her first deer when only eleven. Indicating the antelope, she took careful aim and squeezed off her shot. The antelope bounded away, but one went to its knees, then rolled over on its side. The Go-log shouted with amazement, for accurate shooting with their old rifles was impossible at that range. Two of the riders charged off to recover the game, and she looked into the eyes of the tall rider. "I have another such rifle, and if we are friends, it is yours." "I could kill you and take them both." She returned his look. " They, " she said, indicating the others, "might take it from me. You would not, for you are a man of honor, and I would kill you even as they killed me." She had no doubt of her position, and her chance of ever leaving this place was remote. Whatever was done, she must do herself. He gestured toward the wreck. "Get what you wish, and come with us." Her shooting had impressed them, and now her riding did also, for these were men who lived by riding and shooting. Lok-sha, a jyabo or king of the Go-log people, did not kill her. Escape being impossible, she married him in a Buddhist ceremony, and then to satisfy some Puritan strain within her, she persuaded Tsan-Po, the lama, to read over them in Kansu dialect the Christian ceremony. Fortunately, the plane had not burned, and from it she brought ammunition for the rifles, field glasses, clothing, medicines, and her father's instrument case. Best of all, she brought the books that had belonged to her father and uncle. Having often assisted her father, she understood the emergency treatment of wounds and rough surgery. This knowledge became a valuable asset and solidified her position in the community. As soon as Anna's son was born, she realized the time would come when, if they were not rescued, he would become jyabo, so she began a careful record of migration dates, grass conditions, and rainfall. If it was in her power, she was going to give him the knowledge to be the best leader possible. Excerpted from Beyond the Great Snow Mountains by Louis L'Amour All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

By the Waters of San Tadeop. 1
Meeting at Falmouthp. 24
Roundup in Texasp. 37
Sideshow Championp. 72
Crash Landingp. 110
Under the Hanging Wallp. 120
Coast Patrolp. 162
The Gravel Pitp. 186
The Money Punchp. 204
Beyond the Great Snow Mountainsp. 245
A Note on the Dedicationp. 264
Afterwordp. 266

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