Cover image for Body image : understanding body dissatisfaction in men, women, and children
Title:
Body image : understanding body dissatisfaction in men, women, and children
Author:
Grogan, Sarah, 1959-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London ; New York : Routledge, 1999.
Physical Description:
xii, 225 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780415147842

9780415147859
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BF697.5.B63 G76 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Body Image: Understanding Body Dissatisfaction in Men, Women and Children presents a review of what is presently known and the results of some new research on body image. It compares the effects of gender, sexuality, social class, age and ethnicity on satisfaction with the way we look and suggests how these differences arise. Why, for instance, are heterosexual men much happier with their body images than women or gay men?
Sarah Grogan discusses the effect of media presentation of the ideal body and other cultural influences. Surprisingly, despite the almost exclusive media preference for very young female bodies, she finds that older women are not less satisfied with their bodies than younger women.
Written for readers from a variety of disciplines, this clear and eclectic book will make the ideal text for students from psychology, sociology, gender and media studies.


Summary

Body Image: Understanding Body Dissatisfaction in Men, Women and Children presents a review of what is presently known and the results of some new research on body image. It compares the effects of gender, sexuality, social class, age and ethnicity on satisfaction with the way we look and suggests how these differences arise. Why, for instance, are heterosexual men much happier with their body images than women or gay men?
Sarah Grogan discusses the effect of media presentation of the ideal body and other cultural influences. Surprisingly, despite the almost exclusive media preference for very young female bodies, she finds that older women are not less satisfied with their bodies than younger women.
Written for readers from a variety of disciplines, this clear and eclectic book will make the ideal text for students from psychology, sociology, gender and media studies.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

An important topic, body image has been largely ignored by all but a scant few philosophers, psychologists, and sociologists. These two volumes go a long way toward rectifying this oversight. Grogan's book is more research oriented, Weiss's more philosophical. Both make important points, many of them compatible. For example, Weiss discusses the social nature of body image and individuals' dependence on others to establish perceptions of body image; Grogan looks at how the group to which one turns for social information relevant to body image (e.g., family, friends, media) can have a profound impact. Both authors discuss the importance of examining the elasticity of body image during adolescence, but Grogan speaks specifically to the interconnection of media, advertising, and body image. One particular strength of Weiss's discussion is her challenge of the psychoanalytic notion that body image is gender neutral. This is a very important idea to discuss, and Weiss's arguments mesh well with Grogan's discussion of the differential body image expectations and illnesses of women, men, and children. Although both books are well researched and comprehensive, Grogan's is the more accessible; readers will find its timely cross-cultural research and comparisons interesting and somewhat surprising. A much more difficult read because of her writing style and philosophical tone, Weiss's volume will be beyond the scope of all but the most astute undergraduate and general reader. Both works are highly recommended for graduate students and researchers/faculty, but Grogan's audience will extend to upper-division undergraduates and professionals. R. E. Osborne; Indiana University East


Choice Review

An important topic, body image has been largely ignored by all but a scant few philosophers, psychologists, and sociologists. These two volumes go a long way toward rectifying this oversight. Grogan's book is more research oriented, Weiss's more philosophical. Both make important points, many of them compatible. For example, Weiss discusses the social nature of body image and individuals' dependence on others to establish perceptions of body image; Grogan looks at how the group to which one turns for social information relevant to body image (e.g., family, friends, media) can have a profound impact. Both authors discuss the importance of examining the elasticity of body image during adolescence, but Grogan speaks specifically to the interconnection of media, advertising, and body image. One particular strength of Weiss's discussion is her challenge of the psychoanalytic notion that body image is gender neutral. This is a very important idea to discuss, and Weiss's arguments mesh well with Grogan's discussion of the differential body image expectations and illnesses of women, men, and children. Although both books are well researched and comprehensive, Grogan's is the more accessible; readers will find its timely cross-cultural research and comparisons interesting and somewhat surprising. A much more difficult read because of her writing style and philosophical tone, Weiss's volume will be beyond the scope of all but the most astute undergraduate and general reader. Both works are highly recommended for graduate students and researchers/faculty, but Grogan's audience will extend to upper-division undergraduates and professionals. R. E. Osborne; Indiana University East


Table of Contents

Introduction
Culture and Body Image
The Idealisation of Slenderness
The Basis of Body Shape Ideals
Summary
Women and Body Satisfaction
Assessment of Body Satisfaction
Social Construction of Femininity
Summary
Men and Body Satisfaction
Assessment of Body Satisfaction
Social Construction of Masculinity
Summary
Media Effects
Media Portrayal of the Body
Mass Communication Models
Recent Developments
Reducing the Effects of Media Imagery
Summary
Age, Social Class, Ethnicity and Sexuality
Body Image across the Lifespan
Ethnicity and Body Satisfaction
Social Class and Body Satisfaction
Body Shape, Sexual Attractiveness and Sexuality
Summary
Conclusions and Implications
Groups with Low Body Satisfaction
Development of a Positive Body Image
General Conclusions
Summary
Introduction
Culture and Body Image
The Idealisation of Slenderness
The Basis of Body Shape Ideals
Summary
Women and Body Satisfaction
Assessment of Body Satisfaction
Social Construction of Femininity
Summary
Men and Body Satisfaction
Assessment of Body Satisfaction
Social Construction of Masculinity
Summary
Media Effects
Media Portrayal of the Body
Mass Communication Models
Recent Developments
Reducing the Effects of Media Imagery
Summary
Age, Social Class, Ethnicity and Sexuality
Body Image across the Lifespan
Ethnicity and Body Satisfaction
Social Class and Body Satisfaction
Body Shape, Sexual Attractiveness and Sexuality
Summary
Conclusions and Implications
Groups with Low Body Satisfaction
Development of a Positive Body Image
General Conclusions
Summary

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