Cover image for Back in the saddle again : new essays on the western
Title:
Back in the saddle again : new essays on the western
Author:
Buscombe, Edward.
Publication Information:
London : British Film Institute, 1998.
Physical Description:
vi, 218 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Vanishing Americans : racial and ethnic issues in the interpretation and context of post-war 'pro-Indian' westerns / Steve Neale -- Photographing the Indian / Edward Buscombe -- The professional western : south of the border / Noël Carroll -- Wider horizons : Douglas Fairbanks and nostalgic primitivism / Gaylyn Studlar -- 'Our country'/whose country? The 'Americanisation' project of early westerns / Richard Abel -- Dixie cowboys and blue yodels : the strange history of the singing cowboy / Peter Stanfield -- 'Sixty million viewers can't be wrong' : the rise and fall of the television western / William Boddy -- Finding a new Heimat in the wild west : Karl May and the German western of the 1960's / Tassilo Schneider -- John Ford and Monument Valley / Jean-Louis Leutrat and Suzanne Liandrat-Guigues -- Magazine advertising and the western / Colin McArthur -- The fantasy of authenticity in western costume / Jane Marie Gaines and Charlotte Cornelia Herzog -- The new western American historiography and the emergence of the new American westerns / Rick Worland and Edward Countryman -- The twelve Custers, or, video history / Roberta E. Pearson.
ISBN:
9780851706603

9780851706610
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN1995.9.W4 B24 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

This collection of essays, commissioned for the book, covers aspects of the Western genre such as the early silent western, the western in German cinema, the television westerns of the 1950s, and the singing cowboys of the 1930s. It examines the topic of Native Americans and looks beyond America to examine the European western and to consider the significance of Mexico. The work also looks at the role of westerns in magazine advertising and in fashion, and the spate of TV documentaries on western topics.


Summary

This collection of essays, commissioned for the book, covers aspects of the Western genre such as the early silent western, the western in German cinema, the television westerns of the 1950s, and the singing cowboys of the 1930s. It examines the topic of Native Americans and looks beyond America to examine the European western and to consider the significance of Mexico. The work also looks at the role of westerns in magazine advertising and in fashion, and the spate of TV documentaries on western topics.


Reviews 4

Library Journal Review

The recent deaths of cowboy stars Roy Rogers and Gene Autry have refocused attention on the once thriving Hollywood Western. Despite an unfortunate similarity in titles, these two books cover somewhat different ground. Back in the Saddle consists of biographical essays on film and TV Western stars, including early favorites "Bronco Billy" Anderson, Buck Jones, and Tom Mix, singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Tex Ritter, the Western work of film greats Jimmy Stewart and Steve McQueen, plus a look at the enduring popularity of the TV series Gunsmoke and its star, James Arness. There are also chapters on Western character actors and a review of the increasing importance of Native American actors. Back in the Saddle Again examines the rise, fall, and limited rebirth of the Western's popularity with world film audiences. Despite excessively academic titles, some of these essays will interest general readers. Subjects include John Ford's use of Monument Valley locations, brief histories of TV Westerns and singing cowboy films, the changing portrayal of General Custer in Hollywood films, and a critique of little-known German-made Westerns of the 1960s. Most books on Hollywood Westerns are now out of date or out of print. Though neither book is comprehensive, the first should fill some gaps in public library collections while the second should be considered as a supplementary source for academic libraries only.‘Stephen Rees, Levittown Regional Lib., PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Although the Western film has inspired substantial analysis over the years, it was Jane Tompkins's West of Everything: The Inner Life of Westerns (CH, Nov'92) that revitalized and redirected the critical discourse on the subject. Now Buscombe and Pearson enrich that discussion with their collection of 13 essays by cultural studies scholars. Despite the dramatic decline in the number of Hollywood Westerns over the last 40 years, the editors argue that the iconography and ideology of the Western remain central to American popular culture: the idea of the West as place continues to captivate the national psyche. Topics of the essays range from ethnic representations to concepts of the cowboy to internationalizing, televising, costuming, and updating the genre. The essays vary in originality and depth of insight, and a number probe exciting territory--e.g., Gaylyn Studlar's piece on the singing cowboy and Jane Marie Gaines and Charlotte Cornelia Herzog's study of Western vestments. This collection offers substantive scholarship, providing not only useful critical explorations but an opulent body of endnotes and references. The writing overall is both theoretically informed and accessible to a wide audience of readers (undergraduates, researchers, professionals, and the informed public). A good addition to all academic and most general libraries. L. Babener; Central Washington University


Library Journal Review

The recent deaths of cowboy stars Roy Rogers and Gene Autry have refocused attention on the once thriving Hollywood Western. Despite an unfortunate similarity in titles, these two books cover somewhat different ground. Back in the Saddle consists of biographical essays on film and TV Western stars, including early favorites "Bronco Billy" Anderson, Buck Jones, and Tom Mix, singing cowboys Roy Rogers and Tex Ritter, the Western work of film greats Jimmy Stewart and Steve McQueen, plus a look at the enduring popularity of the TV series Gunsmoke and its star, James Arness. There are also chapters on Western character actors and a review of the increasing importance of Native American actors. Back in the Saddle Again examines the rise, fall, and limited rebirth of the Western's popularity with world film audiences. Despite excessively academic titles, some of these essays will interest general readers. Subjects include John Ford's use of Monument Valley locations, brief histories of TV Westerns and singing cowboy films, the changing portrayal of General Custer in Hollywood films, and a critique of little-known German-made Westerns of the 1960s. Most books on Hollywood Westerns are now out of date or out of print. Though neither book is comprehensive, the first should fill some gaps in public library collections while the second should be considered as a supplementary source for academic libraries only.‘Stephen Rees, Levittown Regional Lib., PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Although the Western film has inspired substantial analysis over the years, it was Jane Tompkins's West of Everything: The Inner Life of Westerns (CH, Nov'92) that revitalized and redirected the critical discourse on the subject. Now Buscombe and Pearson enrich that discussion with their collection of 13 essays by cultural studies scholars. Despite the dramatic decline in the number of Hollywood Westerns over the last 40 years, the editors argue that the iconography and ideology of the Western remain central to American popular culture: the idea of the West as place continues to captivate the national psyche. Topics of the essays range from ethnic representations to concepts of the cowboy to internationalizing, televising, costuming, and updating the genre. The essays vary in originality and depth of insight, and a number probe exciting territory--e.g., Gaylyn Studlar's piece on the singing cowboy and Jane Marie Gaines and Charlotte Cornelia Herzog's study of Western vestments. This collection offers substantive scholarship, providing not only useful critical explorations but an opulent body of endnotes and references. The writing overall is both theoretically informed and accessible to a wide audience of readers (undergraduates, researchers, professionals, and the informed public). A good addition to all academic and most general libraries. L. Babener; Central Washington University


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