Cover image for A taste for splendor : Russian imperial and European treasures from the Hillwood Museum
Title:
A taste for splendor : Russian imperial and European treasures from the Hillwood Museum
Author:
Odom, Anne, 1935-2011.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Alexandria, Va. : Art Service International, 1998.
Physical Description:
340 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 31 cm
General Note:
"Organized and circulated by Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia"--T.p. verso.
Language:
English
Added Author:
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780883971277

9780883971284
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library NK975 .O36 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

Presents Russian objects in their European context, allowing for the unique opportunity to rediscover the interaction of creative design between Russia and western Europe. Commentary on about 250 objects from the Hillwood Museum is generously illustrated with colorplates, and four essays provide historical, social, and artistic context for the objects and collector Marjorie Merriweather Post's activities. Includes a catalogue of works as well as notes on art conservation at Hillwood. Distributed by U. of Washington Press. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Summary

Presents Russian objects in their European context, allowing for the unique opportunity to rediscover the interaction of creative design between Russia and western Europe. Commentary on about 250 objects from the Hillwood Museum is generously illustrated with colorplates, and four essays provide historical, social, and artistic context for the objects and collector Marjorie Merriweather Post's activities. Includes a catalogue of works as well as notes on art conservation at Hillwood. Distributed by U. of Washington Press. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 6

Booklist Review

The easy way to get some culture--without travel or walking--is to peruse these two colorful presentations of two unusual museum collections. Little-known Russian treasures exist in the backyard of our nation's capital, collected and supported by one very generous patron--Marjorie Merriweather Post. Four essays on the collector and the collected precede examination of the Fabergeeggs and other wonderful items in the Hillwood Museum. Yet, as the curator-experts point out, the art of the Russians would be less than complete without an acknowledgment of European influences. Icons and French chaises, censers and fine woodworking intermingle to form a picture of the czarist Russia we never quite knew. A more sobering portrait is painted by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam, where solitary objects, from a glamorous wedding huppah, or canopy, to a World War II armband, tell stories of previous owners. All the collected items are made of cloth, each bearing a brief yet complete tale of its fashioning and intention. Some are everyday objects--pincushions, say, or table linens. Others come imbued with religious significance, such as a circumcision cloth or Torah mantle. Most arresting are the unfinished possessions and chronicles of those who didn't survive the Holocaust. --Barbara Jacobs


Library Journal Review

The Hillwood Museum in Washington houses the Russian Imperial and European art collected by Mrs. Marjorie Merriweather Post, an accomplished businesswoman and passionate connoisseur. The collection is unique in the United States and probably in the world outside Russia and was started when Post accompanied her husband, Ambassador Joseph E. Davies, to Russia in 1937-38. Excellent photographs convey the beauty of the house and the splendor with which it was decorated. The collection contains pieces in every artistic medium‘porcelain, landscape paintings, portraits, furniture, gold and silver objects, crystal, enamel boxes, and more‘and each piece is a work of the highest quality and so arranged that one understands the full range of Russian Imperial achievement in the visual arts. This volume should be included in every library where works on Russian art and culture are collected.‘Martin Chasin, Adult Inst., Bridgeport, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Marjorie Merriwether Post (1887-1973) both inherited and married wealth, which she used to become this century's equivalent of the redoubtable Isabella Stewart Gardner. Both women were major patrons of the arts; their house museums now stand as exemplars of taste and refinement. A Taste for Splendor presents the most important of the many paintings and objects preserved at Hillwood, Mrs. Post's home in Washington, DC. This catalog, a superb example of the genre, offers several kinds of delights. There is the sheer visual delight of the more than 250 beautifully photographed works themselves. The photographs are accompanied by descriptions, which often turn into mini-essays on subjects such as the imperial porcelain factories. Then, too, the essays "The Selling of Russian Art and the Origins of the Hillwood Collection" and "Russian Patronage and European Culture," by Anne Odom, Chief Curator at Hillwood, are important works of scholarship in themselves. All those who love beautiful things will find this a delightful, fascinating, and rewarding book. General readers; undergraduates through faculty. J. M. Curtis; University of Missouri--Columbia


Booklist Review

The easy way to get some culture--without travel or walking--is to peruse these two colorful presentations of two unusual museum collections. Little-known Russian treasures exist in the backyard of our nation's capital, collected and supported by one very generous patron--Marjorie Merriweather Post. Four essays on the collector and the collected precede examination of the Fabergeeggs and other wonderful items in the Hillwood Museum. Yet, as the curator-experts point out, the art of the Russians would be less than complete without an acknowledgment of European influences. Icons and French chaises, censers and fine woodworking intermingle to form a picture of the czarist Russia we never quite knew. A more sobering portrait is painted by the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam, where solitary objects, from a glamorous wedding huppah, or canopy, to a World War II armband, tell stories of previous owners. All the collected items are made of cloth, each bearing a brief yet complete tale of its fashioning and intention. Some are everyday objects--pincushions, say, or table linens. Others come imbued with religious significance, such as a circumcision cloth or Torah mantle. Most arresting are the unfinished possessions and chronicles of those who didn't survive the Holocaust. --Barbara Jacobs


Library Journal Review

The Hillwood Museum in Washington houses the Russian Imperial and European art collected by Mrs. Marjorie Merriweather Post, an accomplished businesswoman and passionate connoisseur. The collection is unique in the United States and probably in the world outside Russia and was started when Post accompanied her husband, Ambassador Joseph E. Davies, to Russia in 1937-38. Excellent photographs convey the beauty of the house and the splendor with which it was decorated. The collection contains pieces in every artistic medium‘porcelain, landscape paintings, portraits, furniture, gold and silver objects, crystal, enamel boxes, and more‘and each piece is a work of the highest quality and so arranged that one understands the full range of Russian Imperial achievement in the visual arts. This volume should be included in every library where works on Russian art and culture are collected.‘Martin Chasin, Adult Inst., Bridgeport, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Marjorie Merriwether Post (1887-1973) both inherited and married wealth, which she used to become this century's equivalent of the redoubtable Isabella Stewart Gardner. Both women were major patrons of the arts; their house museums now stand as exemplars of taste and refinement. A Taste for Splendor presents the most important of the many paintings and objects preserved at Hillwood, Mrs. Post's home in Washington, DC. This catalog, a superb example of the genre, offers several kinds of delights. There is the sheer visual delight of the more than 250 beautifully photographed works themselves. The photographs are accompanied by descriptions, which often turn into mini-essays on subjects such as the imperial porcelain factories. Then, too, the essays "The Selling of Russian Art and the Origins of the Hillwood Collection" and "Russian Patronage and European Culture," by Anne Odom, Chief Curator at Hillwood, are important works of scholarship in themselves. All those who love beautiful things will find this a delightful, fascinating, and rewarding book. General readers; undergraduates through faculty. J. M. Curtis; University of Missouri--Columbia


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