Cover image for Aleksandr Rodchenko
Title:
Aleksandr Rodchenko
Author:
Dabrowski, Magdalena.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York, N. Y. : Museum of Modern Art, 1998.
Physical Description:
336 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780810961876

9780870700644

9780870700637
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library N6999.R62 A4 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area-Oversize
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Summary

Summary

This book is published to accompany the first major American retrospective of Rodchenko's work, at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in the summer of 1998. The essays in Aleksandr Rodchenko explore both phases of his career, drawing out the formal ideas that he developed as well as the social and artistic context in which he moved. The book's plate section, reproducing over 300 works carefully selected from collections in Russia and throughout the West, for the first time presents a full and coherent overview of his diverse achievement. An illustrated chronology outlines the story of the artist's life.


Summary

This comprehensive book, rich in illustrations and relying extensively on new research conducted in Russia, accompanies the first major retrospective exhibition in the United States of Rodchenko's work. An overview of his painting and sculpture, along wiht his diverse experiments and lasting achievements in photocollage, photography, and design.


Summary

Alexander Rodchenko was the most important and versatile member of the Constructivist movement, the progressive artists who created a new art after the Russian Revolution of 1917. This comprehensive book, rich in illustrations and relying extensively on new research from Russia, accompanied the first major retrospective exhibition in the United States of Rodchenko's work at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1998. In 1921 Rodchenko left behind his innovative work in abstract painting and sculpture, committing himself to applied art in the service of revolutionary ideals. Included in this first full and coherent overview are not only Rodchenko's painting and sculpture but also his diverse experiments and lasting achievements in photocollage, photography, and design of all kinds, from books, posters, magazines, and advertising, to furniture.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Best known of the Russian avant-garde artists of the interwar period, Rodchenko has gained ever more attention over the last two decades. The final canonization came in the form of this year's major Museum of Modern Art retrospective. Organized by Dabrowski, senior curator in the department of drawings, this is the first American exhibit to survey his entire career and look at his work in painting, drawing, design, and collage as well as photography. This catalog reproduces all the show's selections, which are valuable for their breadth and high quality more than depth in most areas. Of the five main essays, Leah Dickerman (art history, Stanford Univ.) contributes an especially fine analysis of the importance of political propoganda to the artist. Oddly, as with the show, one comes away wodering if Dabrowski's arguments for Rodchenko's importance aren't a bit too strenuously argued. Nonetheless, this is undoubtedly the most comprehensive and up-to-date look at an important artist‘it works well with Alexander Lavrentiev's more focused Rodchenko: Photography, 1924-1954 (LJ 11/1/96)‘and as such it belongs in serious art collections in larger public and academic libraries.‘Eric Bryant, "Library Journal" (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Rodchenko (1891-1956) was one of the pioneers and greatest artists of the Soviet avant-garde. His output was prodigious, and his command of a variety of media was extraordinary. This volume, based on a major exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in 1998, provides a comprehensive survey of his work, beginning with paintings and drawings from 1915-17, and concluding with photographs made for propaganda purposes in the mid-1930s. As this book makes clear, photography was the pivotal element in Rodchenko's creativity, both as an art form in itself and in his adaptation of photographs for book, magazine, and poster design. Among numerous studies of Rodchenko, this is one of the most significant, not only for the quality and range of its more than 300 illustrations but also because of three thoughtful, scholarly essays that analyze his work and its legacy. In praising his art, the authors do not flinch from Rodchenko's ultimately futile attempt to maintain a belief in the Soviet state during the Stalinist era, when his work served a despotic regime even as he himself was increasingly ostracized. Detailed biographical chronology; exhibit list. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. W. C. Brumfield; Tulane University


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