Cover image for Rimshots : basketball pix, rolls, and rhythms
Title:
Rimshots : basketball pix, rolls, and rhythms
Author:
Smith, Charles R., Jr., 1969-
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Dutton Children's Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
31 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
Stories and poems about playing basketball.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
690 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.2 0.5 44592.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 4.8 3 Quiz: 21924.
ISBN:
9780525460992
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library J FICTION Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

I want to thank you for helping me to exceed my goal. As you can see, your endless talk and chatter only served as fuel for my fire. And judging from the score, you just got burned.This major debut from a talented young writer and photographer is a righteously entertaining medley of quick stories, poems, jokes, and prose meditations focusing on The Game as played by high school and college hopefuls, street warriors, and the pros they all admire. Gritty duotone photographs of street courts and young urban players provide the perfect venue for the bold design of the text as it hums and weaves across the spreads.Inspired by his love of African-American rhythms in writing and jazz, Charles Smith has created a paean to his favorite game that will drive readers' imaginations from the page to the courts and back again.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 4-7. Like Robert Burleigh's Hoops, a Booklist Editors' Choice '97, this sweeps readers into the excitement of a basketball game, but this time the court is on an inner-city street and the text isn't a story in poetry but a collection comprising rhythmical prose that has the flavor of rap, inspirational musings, and concrete poetry. Design is an integral part of the whole. Display type, boldface, italics, and small and large fonts make words leap from the pages. The effect is sometimes too busy, with a purposeful rather than a natural feel. However, the mix usually works, adding energy and drama as narrators look longingly on from the sidelines, anxiously await a pass, or justify an off game with a woeful "I didn't wear my right headband." With too many feet and not enough faces, the sepia-tone photos aren't exceptionally varied, but, blurry with movement, they still catch the frenzied energy of African American players at home on the courts--feet flying, arms arching, hoops swishing. Best of all, Smith's love of the game shines through on every page. (Reviewed March 15, 1999)0525460993Stephanie Zvirin


Publisher's Weekly Review

The endlessly energetic design is the most valuable player in this passionate, idiosyncratic collection of basketball photos, anecdotes, poems and reflections. Lots of colored type and artfully deployed fonts rev up commonplace observations or recollections ("I remember when I was the shortest on the team"; "I remember seeing my parents in the stands, even though I just played the bench"); key words pop out in bright type to give the text the syncopated rhythm of courtside conversations. Curving lines of poems virtually roll across some spreads, enticing even verse-o-phobes to read closely. Smith ranges from the obvious (games he has played, action on the court) to the wry (a page titled "Excuses") to the idiosyncratic (writers whose books he read as he worked on this book) to the poignant (e.g., "Meek"). A professional photographer, Smith is at his best with his informal, sepia-toned photos of basketball action on street courts, which focus largely on players' feet and legs rather than faces‘a sophisticated treatment that goes well with the hip-hop look of the text. This unconventional book might well sneak up on kids who don't think they like to read and score a slam-dunk. Ages 8-up. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5 Up‘Through unusual fonts and splashes of color, the design of this book mirrors the exuberant nature of this American pastime. Like the game, the poems are quick, energetic, and highly rhythmic, and the prose pieces, personal and passionate. The author/photographer reveals his unabashed love of the game and insight into the personal dynamics of the sport in each double-page spread. The pieces are both varied and accessible. In the humorous narrative "No Sole," different voices lecture a player complaining about how much his new shoes hurt. Each narrator remembers how it was "when I was your age," from no high-tech shoes, to no new shoes, to no shoes at all. In `"Please Put Me In, Coach!!"' a boy's pleading voice promises "not to hog," and "I'll listen to you now" if only he can go back in the game. "School's in Session" and "The Sweetest Roll" are gracefully shaped poems that will inspire students to create their own selections. The concluding piece, "Everything I Need to Know in Life, I Learned from Basketball," will surely find its way onto locker-room and gymnasium walls. All of the superb dual-toned photographs depict young men. Once students and teachers become aware of this title, it will bounce right off the shelves.‘Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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