Cover image for Getting around Brown : desegregation, development, and the Columbus public schools
Title:
Getting around Brown : desegregation, development, and the Columbus public schools
Author:
Jacobs, Gregory S., 1969-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Columbus, Ohio : Ohio State University Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xvi, 291 pages ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780814207208

9780814207215
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library LC214.23.C65 J33 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Getting Around Brown is both the first history of school desegregation in Columbus, Ohio, and the first case study to explore the interplay of desegregation, business, and urban development in America.


Summary

This historical study of desegregation in Columbus explores the interplay of business, metropolitan development, and desegregation. The author maintains that the desegregation failed to ensure equal educational opportunity not because it was inherently detrimental to learning, but because it was intrinsically incompatible with the city's steady geographic and economic growth. Topics include the incompatibility of urban schools and residential development, and the troubling ramifications of jurisdictional fragmentation. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Reviews 2

Choice Review

In this study of metropolitan development and school desegregation in Columbus, Ohio, Jacobs shows that business leaders worked to ensure successful, court ordered racial desegregation of schools and to build strong urban schools. However, these actions did not represent a commitment to racial integration. For example, when the city began annexing adjoining municipalities, school officials thought this would create a metropolitan school district. Yet, a powerful, business-led growth consensus successfully opposed letting the Columbus city school system expand into those annexed areas. As a result, from 1980 to 1989 business investment followed residential growth beyond the Columbus school system's borders, leaving city schools with most of the area's low income pupils. Further, although the Ohio General Assembly agreed to transfer to the city schools any unincorporated land annexed by the city, two business people began an elite housing development with city services that remained outside the city schools. Jacobs' study complements such work as Jeffrey Raffel's study of Wilmington, Delaware, The Politics of School Desegregation (1980) and this reviewer's study of Dayton, Ohio, Politics, Race, and Schools (1997). Recommended for general readers, upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, researchers, and faculty. J. Watras University of Dayton


Choice Review

In this study of metropolitan development and school desegregation in Columbus, Ohio, Jacobs shows that business leaders worked to ensure successful, court ordered racial desegregation of schools and to build strong urban schools. However, these actions did not represent a commitment to racial integration. For example, when the city began annexing adjoining municipalities, school officials thought this would create a metropolitan school district. Yet, a powerful, business-led growth consensus successfully opposed letting the Columbus city school system expand into those annexed areas. As a result, from 1980 to 1989 business investment followed residential growth beyond the Columbus school system's borders, leaving city schools with most of the area's low income pupils. Further, although the Ohio General Assembly agreed to transfer to the city schools any unincorporated land annexed by the city, two business people began an elite housing development with city services that remained outside the city schools. Jacobs' study complements such work as Jeffrey Raffel's study of Wilmington, Delaware, The Politics of School Desegregation (1980) and this reviewer's study of Dayton, Ohio, Politics, Race, and Schools (1997). Recommended for general readers, upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, researchers, and faculty. J. Watras University of Dayton


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