Cover image for Lift up your voice like a trumpet : white clergy and the civil rights and antiwar movements, 1954-1973
Title:
Lift up your voice like a trumpet : white clergy and the civil rights and antiwar movements, 1954-1973
Author:
Friedland, Michael B.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
Physical Description:
x, 326 pages ; 24 cm
General Note:
Based on the author's thesis (doctoral)--Boston College, 1993.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1750 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780807823385

9780807846469
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BL65.P7 F73 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

When the Supreme Court declared in 1954 that segregated public

schools were unconstitutional, the highest echelons of

Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish religious organizations

enthusiastically supported the ruling, and black civil rights

workers expected and actively sought the cooperation of their

white religious cohorts. Many white southern clergy, however,

were outspoken in their defense of segregation, and even those

who supported integration were wary of risking their positions by

urging parishioners to act on their avowed religious beliefs in a

common humanity. Those who did so found themselves abandoned by friends, attacked by white supremacists, and often driven from

their communities.



Michael Friedland here offers a collective biography of several

southern and nationally known white religious leaders who did

step forward to join the major social protest movements of the

mid-twentieth century, lending their support first to the civil

rights movement and later to protests over American involvement

in Vietnam. Profiling such activists as William Sloane Coffin

Jr., Daniel and Philip Berrigan, Abraham Joshua Heschel, Eugene

Carson Blake, Robert McAfee Brown, and Will D. Campbell, he

reveals the passions and commitment behind their involvement in these protests and places their actions in the context of a burgeoning ecumenical movement.


Author Notes

Michael Friedland offers a collective biography of several southern and nationally known white religious leaders--including William Sloane Coffin Jr., Daniel and Philip Berrigan, Abraham Joshua Heschel, Eugene Carson Blake, Robert McAfee Brown, and Will D. Campbell--who did step forward to join the major social protest movements of the mid-twentieth century, lending their support first to the civil rights movement and later to protests over American involvement in Vietnam.
Michael B. Friedland, who received his Ph.D. in history from Boston College, works for education reform with the National Faculty.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

White clergy played a crucial role in America's dealing with the two most important social issues of the two decades from 1954 to 1973: race and the Vietnam War. The results of these struggles would have been different and even less satisfactory in outcome had they not been involved. White clergy were obviously not the only players--and they often came late and ill prepared to the efforts--but their contributions colored the results and made history. This account coherently narrates the events and personalities in chronological order, largely from secondary sources. Friedland's biases put too fine a point on a cast of good guys/bad guys, but they can be corrected by David Halberstam's The Children (CH, Jul'98) and Murray Polner and Jim O'Grady's Disarmed and Dangerous (CH, May'97), which will also demonstrate that the obituary for the religious left is premature. Students in political science, American studies and, especially, religious studies will be soundly rewarded in reading this book. Recommended for upper-division undergraduate and graduate students, and professionals and practitioners. D. A. Brown California State University, Fullerton


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 3
Chapter 1 Prophets Without Honor: The Travails of the Southern Clergy, 1954-1960p. 18
Chapter 2 Going South: Northern Clergy and Direction-Action Protests, 1960-1962p. 49
Chapter 3 The Call to Battle: The Churches and Synagogues Enter the Civil Rights Struggle, 1963p. 70
Chapter 4 Bringing Good News to the Oppressed: Clerical Organization in the North South, 1964p. 93
Chapter 5 Flood Tide: Bearing Witness in Alabama, 1965p. 113
Chapter 6 Going Against the Grain: Clergy and Antiwar Movement, 1963-1965p. g140
Chapter 7 A Voice for Moderation: Clergy and the Antiwar Movement, 1966-1967p. 164
Chapter 8 The Escalation of Dissent: The Antiwar Movement, 1967-1968p. 189
Chapter 9 The Costly Peace: The Antiwar Movement, 1968-1973p. 213
Epiloguep. 237
Notesp. 253
Bibliographyp. 287
Indexp. 305

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