Cover image for Strange fruit : plays on lynching by American women
Title:
Strange fruit : plays on lynching by American women
Author:
Perkins, Kathy A., 1954-
Publication Information:
Bloomington : Indiana University Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
x, 423 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Lynching dramas and women : history and critical context / Impact of lynching on the art of African American women / Rachel (1916) / Aftermath (1919) / Forfeit (1925) / Sunday morning in the South (1925) ; Safe (c.1929) ; Blue-eyed Black boy (c.1930) / Climbing Jacob's ladder (1931) / Black souls (1932) / Nails and thorns (1933) / Lawd, does you undahstan'? (1936) / Voice in the wilderness (1944) / Strange fruit (1945) / Miss Ida B. Wells (1983) / Bridge party (1989) / Iola's letter (1994)
ISBN:
9780253333568

9780253211637
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS627.L95 S73 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Addresses the impact of lynching on US theater and culture. By focusing on women's view of lynching, this collection of plays reveals a social history of interracial cooperation between black and white women and an artistic tradition that continues to evolve through the work of African American women artists.


Summary

"These lynching dramas may not present the picture that America wants to see of itself, but these visions cannot be ignored because they are grounded--not only in the truth of white racism's toxic effect on our national existence but also in the truth that there exists a contesting, collective response that is part of an on-going and continually building momentum." --Theaatre Journal

"A unique, powerful collection worthy of high school and college classroom assignment and discussion." --Bookwatch

This anthology is the first to address the impact of lynching on U.S. theater and culture. By focusing on women's unique view of lynching, this collection of plays reveals a social history of interracial cooperation between black and white women and an artistic tradition that continues to evolve through the work of African American women artists. Included are plays spanning the period 1916 to 1994 from playwrights such as Angelina Weld Grimke, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Lillian Smith, and Michon Boston.


Author Notes

Kathy A. Perkins is Associate Professor of Theater at University of Illinois where she heads the Theater Lighting Design Program. She is also the author of Black Female Playwrights: An Anthology of Plays before 1950 and co-editor of Contemporary Plays by Women of Color.
Judith L. Stephens, Associate Professor of Speech Communication at Pennsylvania State University, Schuylkill, serves on the executive Board of the Black Theater Network. She has published articles on women in American theater in African American Review, Theatre Journal, Theatre Annual, Text and Performance Quarterly, and The Journal of American Drama and Theater.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Two short essays by the editors introduce this collection of 15 plays from 13 women. The most notable playwrights included are Lillian Smith (Strange Fruit) and Angelina Weld Grimke, whose Rachel (1920) is the earliest known work on lynching, which the editors consider a genre. Each play in the anthology deals with a lynching's cause or its aftermath. This collection demonstrates that antilynching ideology in drama creates a new opportunity for studying both drama and culture, "how theatre reflects the intersection of artistic and social movements." Although works on this subject by white male authors such as Faulkner and Dreiser and by the African American author Richard Wright, in his collection Uncle Tom's Children, have been more often anthologized, this work reprints women's plays and appends a list of others not included according to era, author's race, and author's gender. In addition, the extensive list of articles and books on the subject makes the book a handy tool for both black studies and women's studies, but from a dialectical rather than a literary approach. All collections. A. Hirsh emeritus, Central Connecticut State University


Choice Review

Two short essays by the editors introduce this collection of 15 plays from 13 women. The most notable playwrights included are Lillian Smith (Strange Fruit) and Angelina Weld Grimke, whose Rachel (1920) is the earliest known work on lynching, which the editors consider a genre. Each play in the anthology deals with a lynching's cause or its aftermath. This collection demonstrates that antilynching ideology in drama creates a new opportunity for studying both drama and culture, "how theatre reflects the intersection of artistic and social movements." Although works on this subject by white male authors such as Faulkner and Dreiser and by the African American author Richard Wright, in his collection Uncle Tom's Children, have been more often anthologized, this work reprints women's plays and appends a list of others not included according to era, author's race, and author's gender. In addition, the extensive list of articles and books on the subject makes the book a handy tool for both black studies and women's studies, but from a dialectical rather than a literary approach. All collections. A. Hirsh emeritus, Central Connecticut State University


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