Cover image for Hitler's fatal sickness and other secrets of the Nazi leaders : why Hitler "threw victory away"
Title:
Hitler's fatal sickness and other secrets of the Nazi leaders : why Hitler "threw victory away"
Author:
Lattimer, John.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Hippocrene Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
272 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780781807425
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DD244 .L378 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library DD244 .L378 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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On Order

Reviews 2

Booklist Review

People don't get sicker and more secretive than Hitler and his cronies. Hitler had parkinsonism, Lattimer posits, probably the "faster moving post-encephalitic" sort, and he cites reports of Hitler's tremors, first in the left hand, then spreading to other limbs; his well-documented attacks of rage; and the discontinuation of his "powerful public appearances" after 1940 as chief among many clues supporting his thesis. As for the fuhrer's sidekicks, Lattimer reveals how Goring's tailors coped with his ponderous and fluctuating physique and presents photographic evidence of his daughter Edda trying to avoid the fuhrer's attentions. Jodl, Keitel, the insufferable Ribbentrop, Speer, and Streicher all receive Lattimer's scrutiny, but there are no chapters on Himmler and Goebbels, who both cheated justice--and this book based on discoveries of the Nuremberg trials--by committing suicide before they could be tried. Good, disquieting reading about some of history's master miscreants. --Mike Tribby


Library Journal Review

Dr. Lattimer was a U.S. Army surgeon who had access as a consulting urologist to the Nazi leaders tried for war crimes at Nuremberg. This book records his professional impressions of those men and their medical conditions. Included is a lengthy chapter on Adolf Hitler's health problems, with a resulting (and surprising) diagnosis of advanced Parkinson's disease. More important than the text, which needs more editing and some scholarly documentation, are the photographs, many showing personal artifacts of the Nazi leaders. More than 400 are reproduced, many from the author's collection and not available elsewhere. World War II buffs will probably enjoy, historians less so. For public libraries with adequate book budgets.ÄEdward Gibson, Langston Hughes Memorial Lib., Lincoln Univ., PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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