Cover image for Edmund White : the burning world
Title:
Edmund White : the burning world
Author:
Barber, Stephen, 1961-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
viii, 310 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780312199746
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS3573.H463 Z54 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library PS3573.H463 Z54 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

The first biography of Edmund White, the most acclaimed gay novelist of his generation--fully authorized by White himself. 16-page photo section.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

A vivid prose stylist and a premier chronicler of gay life, gay desire and gay liberation, Edmund White has achieved renown as a novelist and as a nonfiction writer. A Boy's Own Story helped define the coming-out novel; the decades of journalism collected in The Burning Library gave gay male America a detailed picture of itself, sometimes angry, often celebratory. And his colossal biography of Jean Genet gave Anglophone readers new access to the rule-smashing French author. This authorized biography follows White's life from his birth in 1940, in Cincinnati, to his current residence in Paris. Barber's (Fragments of the European City) fluid prose demonstrates intense research, accompanied by a tendency to stay close to his subject's point of view, with some passages appearing to be paraphrased from interviews with White. The biography touches on White's array of friends and famous allies, among them Robert Mapplethorpe, Susan Sontag, James Merrill and Adam Mars-Jones. White immersed himself in the gay New York of the 1970s; his move to Paris in 1983 divides his adult life neatly in half. Barber's account of the Paris years is slower pacedÄand more revealingÄbut sexual encounters, social misadventures and literary accomplishments in both cities get adequate coverage, as do White's months on an idyllic Turkish island and his entanglements in Brown University's campus politics. White's later fiction records the awful impact of HIV, and Barber rises to painful eloquence in describing the last days of White's beloved partner, Hubert Sorin, who died of AIDS in Morocco in 1994. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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