Cover image for Piloting at night
Title:
Piloting at night
Author:
Bjork, Lewis.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : McGraw-Hill, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xvii, 205 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780070066984

9780070066977
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TL711.N5 B57 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Written by a commercial pilot, this instructional guide focuses on the practical knowledge and skills required to successfully operate an airplane at night. Using quotes from experienced aviators, accident records, personal histories, federal regulations, and the Airman's Information Manual, each ch


Author Notes

Lewis Bjork is a pilot for Skywest Airlines. A specialist in aerobatics with thousands of instruction hours, he has flown more than 230 types of airplanes


Table of Contents

Introductionp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xvi
1 Up in the Nightp. 1
Background Informationp. 4
Techniquep. 19
2 Planningp. 23
Background Informationp. 25
Engine Failurep. 27
Fuelp. 30
Weatherp. 31
Lightp. 32
Terrainp. 34
Navigationp. 35
Restp. 36
Equipmentp. 37
Techniquep. 41
The Chartp. 41
Airports and Facility Informationp. 42
Routep. 43
Weatherp. 44
Flight Followingp. 44
Performance and Fuelp. 44
Physical Preparationp. 45
Skills to Practicep. 45
3 Committing Aviation in the Darkp. 49
Background Informationp. 50
FAR 1.1 Definitionsp. 50
FAR 1.2 Abbreviations and Symbolsp. 51
Requirements for Pilot Certification--Night Operationsp. 52
FAR 61.57(b) Night Takeoff and Landing Experiencep. 52
FAR 61.89 General Limitations [of Student Pilots]p. 52
FAR 61.93 Solo Cross-Country Flight Requirementsp. 53
FAR 61.101 Recreational Pilot Privileges and Limitationsp. 54
FAR 61.107 Flight Proficiency [Private Pilots]p. 55
FAR 61.109 Airplane Rating: Aeronautical Experiencep. 55
FAR 61.109 Aeronautical Experience [Private Pilots]p. 56
FAR 61.125 Aeronautical Knowledge [Commercial Pilots]p. 56
FAR 61.129 Aeronautical Experiencep. 57
FAR 61.159 Aeronautical Experience: Airplane Category Ratingp. 57
FAR 61.167 Privileges [Airline Transport Pilots]p. 58
FAR 91.3(a)p. 58
FAR 91.7(b)p. 59
FAR 91.13(a)p. 59
FAR 91.103p. 59
FAR 91.111(a)p. 59
FAR 91.119p. 60
FAR 91.121(a)p. 60
FAR 91.123p. 60
FAR 91.125 ATC Light Signalsp. 61
FAR 91.137(a)p. 63
FAR 91.151(a)p. 64
FAR 91.155 Basic VFR Weather Minimumsp. 64
FAR 91.157 Special VFR Weather Minimumsp. 66
FAR 91.167 Fuel Requirements for Flight in IFR Conditionsp. 66
FAR 91.173 ATC Clearance and Flight Plan Requiredp. 67
FAR 91.177 Minimum Altitudes for IFR Opertionsp. 67
Subpart C--Equipment, Instrument, and Certificate Requirementsp. 67
FAR 91.205 Powered Civil Aircraft with Standard Category U.S. Airworthiness Certificates: Instrument and Equipment Requirementsp. 67
FAR 91.209 Aircraft Lightsp. 71
FAR 91.211 Supplemental Oxygenp. 73
FAR 91.213 Inoperative Instruments and Equipmentp. 73
Subpart D--Special Flight Operationsp. 74
FAR 91.303 Aerobatic Flightp. 74
FAR 91.305 Flight Test Areasp. 74
FAR 91.309 Towing: Glidersp. 74
FAR 91.311 Towing: Other than under 91.309p. 74
FAR 91.313 Restricted Category Civil Aircraft: Operating Limitationsp. 75
FAR 135, Subpart C Aircraft and Equipmentp. 75
FAR 135.159p. 75
FAR 135.161 Radio and Navigational Equipment: Carrying Passengers under VFR at Night or under VFR Over-the-Topp. 75
FAR 163. Equipment Requirements: Aircraft Carrying Passengers under IFRp. 75
FAR 135.181p. 76
Techniquep. 76
4 Physiology at Nightp. 79
Background Informationp. 81
Circadian Rhythms and Metabolismp. 82
Fatiguep. 83
Visionp. 84
Hearing, Balance, and Motion Sicknessp. 91
Respiration and Oxygenp. 95
Psychologyp. 96
Judgmentp. 98
Techniquep. 99
Eyesp. 99
Sleepp. 99
Staying Awakep. 101
Vertigo, Disorientation, and Motion Sicknessp. 102
Skills to Practicep. 104
5 Take-off and Climbp. 105
Background Informationp. 109
Is the Runway Clear?p. 110
Can You See Lights?p. 110
Attitude Control after Rotationp. 111
Transition to Instrumentsp. 112
Techniquep. 112
Clearing the Runwayp. 113
Avoiding Obstaclesp. 113
Use of a Climb Profilep. 114
Instrument Departure Proceduresp. 115
Take-off Performancep. 116
Skills to Practicep. 117
Unusual Attitudep. 118
Vertigo/Recoveryp. 118
6 En route Navigation, Maneuvering, and Weatherp. 119
Background Informationp. 122
Visibilityp. 122
Seeing and Avoiding Weatherp. 123
Diurnal Temperature Shiftp. 125
Humidity-Related Temperature Changesp. 126
Land and Water Phenomenap. 127
Diurnal Fog and Cloudsp. 129
Weatherp. 131
Icingp. 132
Pilotagep. 134
Dead Reckoningp. 135
Traffic Avoidancep. 136
Techniquep. 137
Decision Aidsp. 138
Skills to Practicep. 139
7 Approach and Landingp. 141
Background Informationp. 144
Airport Beaconp. 145
Control of Lighting Systemsp. 147
Pilot Controlled Lightingp. 148
Lighted Wind Indicatorp. 148
Traffic Control Light Signalsp. 149
Visual Glide Slope Indicatorsp. 150
Approach Lightsp. 153
Runway Lightsp. 155
Lead-in Lights for Taxiwaysp. 158
Need Chartsp. 158
Techniquep. 160
Visual Illusionsp. 162
Up- and Down-sloped Runwaysp. 166
Approaching over Obstaclesp. 166
Thank Goodness for VASI Lightsp. 168
Landing Performancep. 168
A Cautious Approachp. 169
Clearing the Runwayp. 170
Skills to Practicep. 170
Stabilized Approachp. 170
Turn Off the Landing Lightp. 170
Stealth Landingp. 171
8 Emergenciesp. 173
Background Informationp. 178
Some Novel Solutions to the "Night Question"p. 179
Night Vision Gogglesp. 179
Invasion Flaresp. 180
Smudge Potsp. 180
Super-powerful Landing Lightsp. 180
Spotlightsp. 180
Handheld Equipmentp. 181
Parachutesp. 181
Redundant Equipmentp. 181
Go-No Go Decisionp. 181
Techniquep. 183
Skills to Practicep. 183
Appendix There Are Many Ways to "Go Bump" in the Darkp. 187
Indexp. 201

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