Cover image for Yaşar Kemal on his life and art
Title:
Yaşar Kemal on his life and art
Author:
Yaşar Kemal, 1922 or 1923-2015.
Uniform Title:
Yachar Kemal, entretiens avec Alain Bosquet. English
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xxix, 167 pages : maps ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780815605515
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PL248.Y275 Z9513 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

For over four decades Yasar Kemal has been one of Turkey's greatest and best-known writers. His works have been translated into every major language, and he has been short-listed several times for the Nobel Prize in Literature.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This unusual book consists of a "conversation in correspondence" carried out between French writer Alain Bosquet and Turkish novelist Ya,sar (misspelled Ya,sal on the title page) Kemal during the years 1984-89. Neither knows the other's language, so Bosquet's questions in French were translated into Turkish and Kemal's Turkish replies were translated into French. The book was first published in French (Paris: 1992) and then in Turkish (Istanbul: 1993). Since Bosquet is emphatically French in conceptualizing his questions and Kemal is resolutely Turkish in trying to understand them, from the beginning communication was anything but efficient, and the English version (translated from the French edition, with some reference to the Turkish) is somewhat distant from what Kemal must have first said in Turkish. Kemal's first novel, Memed, My Hawk (translated into English in 1961) brought him fame in the US. Several other novels have been translated, but the author has gradually slipped from favor. As Turkey's best known novelist, he deserves to be better known here. This reviewer hopes that this book, which has a certain charm, will help, though even the translators' labors could not rescue it from repetitiveness. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. W. L. Hanaway; University of Pennsylvania


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