Cover image for Mighty river : a portrait of the Fraser
Title:
Mighty river : a portrait of the Fraser
Author:
Bocking, Richard C.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Vancouver : Douglas & McIntyre ; Seattle, WA : University of Washington Press, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
ix, 294 pages : maps ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781550545234

9780295976709
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library F1089.F7 B63 1997 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Filmmaker and water resources activist Richard Bocking provides a well-researched account of Canada's Fraser River, from its source down to the Pacific Ocean, addressing the many human and natural histories that conflict and conspire in its present state and future well-being. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR


Summary

The Fraser River's domain is vast: its basin encompasses half of British Columbia's forests and agricultural lands, the majority of the province's salmon streams, and two-thirds of its human population. Mighty River follows the Fraser from its source down to the Pacific, recounting many of the human and natural histories that intertwine on its banks. Richard Bocking describes the delicate ecosystems nourished by the Fraser and offers vivid historical glimpses of Native Americans, explorers like Alexander Mackenzie and Simon Fraser, and gold seekers trekking the river's canyon.

Looking beyond the river's beauty, Bocking describes how careless development wounded the Fraser in the past and keeps the river vulnerable today. As the Fraser descends, it presents a microcosm of the conflicts and choices that dominate North America's economic and environmental agendas.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Bocking's study is more than a mere descriptive essay on one of Canada's premier rivers; rather, it is a carefully researched and well-written narrative of an entire watershed. The text is crisp and not only deals with the history of settlement and development along the river, but also chronicles the significant changes in the Fraser and its tributaries that are contributing to the environmental imbalance within the watershed. From the initial chapter the author makes a convincing case for the early realization by developers (timber and railroad at first) that the region's ecology existed in a delicate balance. Dreams of turning the wilderness into paradise faded rapidly. Each chapter treats a different segment of the river, giving an overview of its physical situation, followed by a brief history of settlement and development, and ending with an analysis of the current impact of settlement and development on the ecosystem. Insights provided by residents, environmentalists, and developers/entrepreneurs who live in the watershed help keep the narrative informative without becoming stridently polemical. The final chapter is an essay pondering the future of the river system. Contains maps of each section of the river and an excellent bibliography. All levels. G. Jeane Samford University


Choice Review

Bocking's study is more than a mere descriptive essay on one of Canada's premier rivers; rather, it is a carefully researched and well-written narrative of an entire watershed. The text is crisp and not only deals with the history of settlement and development along the river, but also chronicles the significant changes in the Fraser and its tributaries that are contributing to the environmental imbalance within the watershed. From the initial chapter the author makes a convincing case for the early realization by developers (timber and railroad at first) that the region's ecology existed in a delicate balance. Dreams of turning the wilderness into paradise faded rapidly. Each chapter treats a different segment of the river, giving an overview of its physical situation, followed by a brief history of settlement and development, and ending with an analysis of the current impact of settlement and development on the ecosystem. Insights provided by residents, environmentalists, and developers/entrepreneurs who live in the watershed help keep the narrative informative without becoming stridently polemical. The final chapter is an essay pondering the future of the river system. Contains maps of each section of the river and an excellent bibliography. All levels. G. Jeane Samford University


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