Cover image for The falling sickness; a history of epilepsy from the Greeks to the beginnings of modern neurology.
Title:
The falling sickness; a history of epilepsy from the Greeks to the beginnings of modern neurology.
Author:
Temkin, Owsei, 1902-2002.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Second edition, revised.
Publication Information:
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins Press [1971]
Physical Description:
xv, 467 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Subject Term:
ISBN:
9780801812118
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library RC372 .T4 1971 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Summary

Summary

"The definitive account... Detailed, meticulous, and accurate."-- American Scientist. Owsei Temkin presents the history of epilepsy in Western civilization from ancient times to the beginnings of modern neurology. First published in 1945 and thoroughly revised in 1971, this classic work by one of the history of medicine's most eminent scholars now returns to print in a new softcover edition. Softshell Books.


Author Notes

Owsei Temkin, who received his medical degree from the University of Leipzig, is William H. Welch Professor Emeritus of the History of Medicine and former director of the Johns Hopkins Institute of the History of Medicine


Table of Contents

Preface to Second Editionp. vii
Preface to First Editionp. ix
Part 1 Antiquity
I. Epilepsy: the Sacred Diseasep. 3
1. The Concept of the Sacred Diseasep. 3
2. The Magiciansp. 10
3. Sacred Disease and Epilepsyp. 15
4. Physicians and Magicp. 21
II. Epilepsy in Ancient Medical Sciencep. 28
1. The Clinical Picturep. 31
a. Etiologyp. 31
b. Definitionsp. 36
c. Aurap. 37
d. The Epileptic Attackp. 40
e. The Course of the Diseasep. 42
f. Prognosis and Complicationsp. 44
g. Diagnosisp. 47
h. Differential Diagnosisp. 49
2. Theoriesp. 51
a. The Fifth and Fourth Centuriesp. 51
b. Third Century B.C.--Second Century A.D.p. 56
c. Galenp. 60
3. Treatmentp. 65
a. Indications and Aim of Treatmentp. 65
b. Methods and Theory of Treatmentp. 66
c. The Problem of Pharmacologyp. 78
Part 2 The Middle Ages
III. Epilepsy: The Falling Sicknessp. 85
1. Names and Notionsp. 85
a. Possessionp. 86
b. Lunacyp. 92
c. The Falling Evilp. 96
2. Cure and Preventionp. 102
a. Magic and Superstitionp. 102
b. Saints and Relicsp. 109
c. Infectionp. 114
IV. Medieval Medical Theoriesp. 118
1. Early Middle Agesp. 118
2. Scholasticismp. 121
Part 3 The Renaissance
V. Theological, Philosophical, and Social Aspectsp. 137
1. The Theological Debatep. 138
a. The Debate on Possessionp. 138
b. The Debate on Witchcraftp. 141
c. The Debate on Magic and Superstitious Treatmentp. 144
2. The Epileptic as a Prophetp. 148
a. Prophesying Epilepticsp. 148
b. Epilepsy and Prophetic Trancep. 154
3. Some Social Aspectsp. 161
a. Great Epilepticsp. 161
b. Beggars and Cheatsp. 164
4. Paracelsus and Hermetic Medicinep. 170
a. Paracelsusp. 170
b. Allegoriesp. 177
c. Van Helmontp. 181
VI. Broadening Experience and Changing Theoryp. 184
1. New Observationsp. 184
2. New Theoriesp. 195
Part 4 The Great Systems and the Period of Enlightenment
VII. The Great Systemsp. 205
1. Iatrochemists and Iatrophysicistsp. 205
2. Animism and Eclecticismp. 213
VIII. The Enlightenmentp. 220
1. The Fight against the Supernatural and Occultp. 220
a. The Rationalistic Interpretation of Possessionp. 220
b. The Revolt against the Occultp. 227
c. The Purging of Therapyp. 232
2. Pathology and Nosologyp. 241
a. Pathologyp. 241
b. Nosologyp. 247
Part 5 The Nineteenth Century (1800-1861)
IX. First Period: 1800-1833p. 255
1. The Hospitalization of Epilepticsp. 255
a. Terminologyp. 257
b. Statisticsp. 260
c. Psychiatric Studiesp. 265
2. Anatomical Optimism and Pessimismp. 271
X. Second Period: 1833-1861p. 278
1. The Reflex Theoryp. 278
2. Nosological Doubtsp. 285
3. Therapyp. 291
Part 6 The Nineteenth Century--the Age of Hughlings Jackson
XI. Jackson's Forerunnersp. 303
1. The Situation around 1860p. 303
2. Jacksonian Epilepsyp. 305
a. Bravais and Brightp. 305
b. Todd, Carpenter, and Wilksp. 311
3. The Dreamy State (Psychomotor Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe Epilepsy)p. 316
a. Morel, Griesinger, Falretp. 316
b. Herpinp. 324
XII. John Hughlings Jacksonp. 328
XIII. The End of the Falling Sickness?p. 347
1. Idiopathic Epilepsyp. 347
2. Epilepsy and Hysteriap. 351
3. Crime, Religion, and the Epileptic Characterp. 359
4. The World of the Epilepticp. 370
Epiloguep. 383
Appendix Ip. 391
Appendix IIp. 393
Bibliographyp. 397
Index of Personal Namesp. 445
Index of Subjectsp. 455

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